August 26, 2006

Koi in Hiding / Losing Koi / Reader Response to Controlling Mosquitos

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Today's Pond Q&A

In this issue:

- Koi in Hiding

- Why Am I Losing Koi?

- Reader Response to Controlling Mosquitos

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To view today's Q&A online, click here:
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Question #1>

Hi Carolyn,

I was hoping you can help me. My Koi hide all the time. If you
look in my pond you would think there is nothing in it. I had
another pond in my old home and the Koi always came up when I fed
them.

My Koi do not come up when I feed them, in fact they do not seem
to eat much even though it is summertime.

I have tested the water and it is fine. The pond is completely
enclosed and so there is no fear of predators. Please help,

==

Answer #1>

Hi,

My guess is that these are pretty small koi, no? It is natural for
the baby koi to hide, so they can live to become big koi. Even
among adult koi, each has their own personality. One will be
adventurous and friendly while others will be stand-offish,
elusive.

I hope you are removing any uneaten food five minutes after feeding
so it doesn't rot in there and putrefy the water.

If you provide plenty of "hiding places" in the pond, such as caves
and plants, they will eventually surface, when ready

Regards,
Carolyn


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Question #2>

Hi Carolyn,

I have an approx. 250 gl. pond for over five years with goldfish and
Koi. This summer for some unknown reason I can happily say my pond
looks wonderful.

However last week I replaced some of the evaporated water and the
next day two of my prize koi died. I did put de-chlorinating fluid
in but not until the next day.

Could that have caused the loss of the two fish? The other Koi and
goldfish seem to be okay, I hope.

Thank you so much for your column it has been wonderful.

==


Answer #2>

Hi,

I seriously doubt that topping off the pond would kill fish.
However, when adding new water you ought to add the dechlorinator
before you add the new water and not a day later. By that time
there would be no need to add it at all.

My guess is that your pond is overcrowded and perhaps the deaths
were coincidental with addition of new water? Have you done
anything else lately? Have you added an algaecide? Is the filter
kept clean? How are the rest of the fish behaving?

I might suggest actually doing a water change. Hopefully you are
testing the water to be sure there is no readable ammonia or
nitrite levels in there.

Also, has any yard work been done recently, any pesticide
applications that might have drifted into the pond?

There are some things to be aware of that can have toxic results,
like adding salt to a pond when using zeolite (or Ammo-Lock) in the
filter. What happens is that by adding salt to zeolite, the
zeolite purges itself of all the ammonia and empties it back into
the system which can kill the fish with a huge ammonia spike. Were
you using salt and zeolite perhaps?

Is there any CCA treated lumber around the pond? (It contains
arsenic, therefore is no longer being sold.)

If you don't have a current water test kit, I suggest you get one.
These should be replaced anually because the reagents can become
outdated and give false readings.

Hope this has helped.

Regards,
Carolyn


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RESPONSE TO CONTROLLING MOSQUITOS>


Hi Carolyn,

You have an email friend which says she has mosquito problem. I
have some input for you. I live in Ontario,Canada and I have fish
which are called orphies.

They are like minnows, and they eat mosquitos, bugs, spiders --
anything that lands on or near the water. They swim very well with
koi and get along with koi as well but you must buy them in odd
numbers (example 3 or 5 at a time) because they school together
better. Hopefully this might help you out.

==


Carolyn's Answer>

Hi,

Right, orfes are great "buggers" in a pond. They are very fast
swimmers and look good when swimming in a school. No, they don't
like to be alone, or the only one of their kind in the pond. You
have to have more than one.

Regards,
Carolyn


========== @SK Carolyn =================
Have a pond question? Just send it in
to: Carolyn@macarthurwatergardens.com
and our own in-house pond expert will
try and answer it for you! Write POND
in the subject line for quick response!
========================================


Happy Pondkeeping!

Brett Fogle
MacArthur Water Gardens
www.macarthurwatergardens.com

MacArthur Water Gardens
1698 SW 16th ST
Boca Raton, FL 33486

Posted by bfogle at 06:09 PM | Comments (0)

August 23, 2006

Anacharis / Raccoons

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Today's Pond Q&A

In this issue:

- Too Much Anacharis?

- Raccoons Fishing without a License

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Question #1>

Hi Carolyn,

I have a question:

I live in northern New Jersey and have a 1000 gal. pond. Since last
winter was not as cold as previous winters the Anacharis did not
die off. I did not know this at the beginning of this season and
added two more bunched.

Well now I have 70% of my pond bottom covered with Anacharis. The
fish and water quality are great except you see the Anacharis
instead of the bottom where the Anacharis is growing.

Will this hurt my fish or water quality, should I remove some or
leave it alone . . . I have 2 KOI, Goldfish and Shubunkins. I have
an Aquascape Ecosystem with a Biofalls and Skimmer plus 2 water
lilies, Iris, Parrot feathers and some other plants.

Please advise.

==


Answer #1>

Hi,

No, I don't think this is going to do any harm to the fish.
If they spawn they will love the wonderful soft carpet

Regards,
Carolyn


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Question #2>

Hi Carolyn,

I have only a small pond, about 5 ft. in diameter, and
have tried goldfish a couple of times. Both times, they have
become a sushi meal for some local raccoons, which is sad to
experience.

An ancillary consequence of the raccoon raids, however, is that
they also tear up my lily plants, and in the morning after, the
pond is a muddy mess of torn up lily pads.

How can I keep the little buggers away from my pond?

Any suggestions?

==


Answer #2>

Hi,

Raccoons are one of my best subjects. I've had extensive experience
with these guys, some good and some bad. But in the end, the only
sure way to protect the pond is with an electrified fence. They
sell low voltage fences for ponds, I believe the brand name is
Fi-Shock.

Once a raccoon has fished in your pond you can never again safely
keep fish. In your case, simply because they THINK there might be
fish in there, even your lilies are not safe anymore.

You should see what they have done to my cattails. Wow, cattail
soup... Wish I knew how they do that. Makes me very mad. But I
have seen ponds and talked to the owners who are using the electric
fences and it even stops otters and minks.

Regards,
Carolyn


========== @SK Carolyn =================
Have a pond question? Just send it in
to: Carolyn@macarthurwatergardens.com
and our own in-house pond expert will
try and answer it for you! Write POND
in the subject line for quick response!
========================================


Happy Pondkeeping!

Brett Fogle
MacArthur Water Gardens
www.macarthurwatergardens.com

MacArthur Water Gardens
1698 SW 16th ST
Boca Raton, FL 33486


Posted by bfogle at 11:37 PM | Comments (0)

August 17, 2006

Repairing Liner Leaks / Mosquito Fish / Reader Response

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Today's Pond Q&A

In this issue:

- Repairing Liner Leaks

- Controlling Mosquito Fish

- Reader Response to Duckweed Question

- Reader Response to Using Malathion to Control Aphids

-----------------------------

Question #1>

Hi Carolyn,

Is there any way to repair a leak in the liner without emptying the
pond? I have heard that you can add bentonite agitate it and as the
leak pulls it in the bentotite will seal the leak.

Have you heard this? Thanks for any help you can give me.

==

Answer #1>

Hi,

I think that really depends upon the leak, how big the hole and
where it is located. I certainly wouldn't want to trust a hole in
the bottom of my pond to a clay remedy. In fact, I have heard that
many natural ponds are lined with bentonite clay to contain the
water, but I don't think the idea of repairing a leak with clay
will hold water, no pun intended.

I have a pond and a waterbed. That said, I would repair both the
same way. I dry the area around the hole, use alcohol to clean
it, and then apply a contact cement. To this, I apply a piece of
liner and hold until the glue sets. Then I would not refill the
pond until the glue has set for at least 12 hours.

It is similar with a waterbed except that the patch is on the
outside and the water is inside, and you hope you can keep it in
while the glue sets. At any rate, you don't go to bed until later
that night when you're sure it isn't still leaking. In the same
way, watch the hole you patched on the pond liner for any sign of
leaks, or air bubbles, when you refill the pond.

Luckily I have only had to repair one leak in my pond liner because
the algae and bacterial growth can make it very difficult to clean
thoroughly for a good seal.

Regards,
Carolyn

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Question #2>

Hi Carolyn,

Thank you for all your help. I really appreciate your including me
in your e mail.

My question this time is: Is there any other reason to have
mosquito fish in a pond other than eating mosquito larvae? They
multiply so quickly that I must have thousands in my 20,000 gallon
pond. I think they are a nuisance; they scare away the other fish
at feeding time and I wonder if they are contributing significantly
to waste deposits in the pond.

How can I get rid of them. When I cleaned out the pond in the
spring, I thought that would take care of them, but it didn't phase
them that I can tell. Doesn't keeping the water circulating all
the time keep down the mosquito population?

I'm so new at this, I am really grateful for your help.

==

Answer #2>

Hi,

I have never actually put mosquito fish in a pond for mosquito
control. Generally, I prefer to use them in bog gardens and water
gardens that aren't filtered well but are heavily planted. I
prefer to use Microbe-Lift/Biological Mosquito Control in the pond.
http://www.macarthurwatergardens.com/microbe-lift/microbe-lift-
mosquito-control.shtml

I should agree with you that any fish, even small ones, will
contribute to the bio-waste. Depending upon where you live, the
mosquito fish will or will not live through the winters. We have
had them live through winters in NY if in a deep enough pond, like
yours, but in bogs that are shallow, they die back.

I would think they might make a nice meal for game fish instead of koi.
Koi and carp don't eat their own. Maybe try a very fine seine net?

Regards,
Carolyn

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RESPONSE TO OUR EARLIER DUCKWEED QUESTION>

Hi Carolyn,

I enjoy your pond q/a emails. Thanks for doing this!

I am the water plants person at a nursery here in Menlo Park, CA
(Bay Area, peninsula) where we have a koi pond and several smaller
water features. My experience with duckweed is that during the day
when there's plenty of light it adds oxygen, but if the entire
surface is covered it can somewhat deplete oxygen at night. Like
all green plants, duckweed produces O2 in the light and consumes it
in the dark.

In my experience, if a pond is at least a foot or so deep and there
are not too many fish, a cover layer of duckweed is not a problem
at night. But if the pond is quite shallow the O2 level can drop
at night if there's a solid cover of duckweed.

I hope that helps...!


RESPONSE TO USING MALATHION TO CONTROL APHIDS>

Hi Carolyn,

Someone put a bottle of "malathion 50 plus" in my KOI tank. My tank
is a polyethelene 1100 gal tank. There were 17 KOI, 5 african
cichlids and 1 pleco in the tank. All of them died.

I called the police to report it and they called HAZ MAT and the
fire dept. The fire dept and Haz Mat declared my tank a toxic site.
Haz Mat and the fire dept pumped out my tank and took my fish (
toxic waste ) and told me my whole system would never be fish safe
again.

I called Chevron Chemical and Ortho the manufacturer of malathion
and their engineers told me the half life of malathion was forever
(it will not break down ever), and the fatal dose for aquatic life
is so small my tank and my filter (Ultima II 200) and the plumbing
in the system will never be fish safe again.

For now I guess this has killed my fish hobby. I lost over $5000 in
my KOI alone.

You want to be very cautious using any pestisides around a pond.

==

Carolyn's Answer>

Hi,

I think I told them to remove the infested plants from the pond, use
the chemical, and then rinse well before returning it to the pond.

In our area of NY they have been using a diluted malathion spray in
an arial application to try to stem the tide of West Nile Virus.

I should have recommended Insecticidal Soap to be used in the same
way, as a dip for the aphid removal, then rinsed before replacing
the plants in the pond. As always, you should read labels and follow
the directions carefully before attempting any new procedures.

Thank you for sharing that painful experience with us.

Regards,
Carolyn


========== @SK Carolyn =================
Have a pond question? Just send it in
to: Carolyn@macarthurwatergardens.com
and our own in-house pond expert will
try and answer it for you! Write POND
in the subject line for quick response!
========================================

Happy Pondkeeping!

Brett Fogle
MacArthur Water Gardens
www.macarthurwatergardens.com


Posted by bfogle at 06:59 PM | Comments (0)

August 15, 2006

Aphids / Duckweed

-------------------------------
Today's Pond Q&A

In this issue:

- Bugs on Water Lettuce

- Duckweed as a Natural Control for Hyacinths

-----------------------------

Question #1>

Hi Carolyn,

I have beautiful water lettuce. All of a sudden they started getting
these tiny black bugs on them. You have to look real close to see
they are a tiny bug of some sort. They are slowly destroying them.

Is there anything I can do to save them? They are just covered with
them. I tried washing them off so the fish would eat them, but I'm
sure they will be back.

Any suggestions, I don't want to lose them all. Thanks again.

==


Answer #1>

Hi,

Those are aphids. I hate them and they can really make the plants
look ugly, but washing them off or removing by hand is one way to
handle them. Or you can remove the plants to a separate tub, spray
with malathion, wait 20 minutes, and then rinse and return to the
pond.

If you look at your roses, you will find them there too, but
they come in a variety of colors. The roses may harbor the green
ones while another plant may have red ones.

Regards,
Carolyn


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Question #2>

Hi Carolyn,

I had an interesting experience with Duckweed several years ago. We
had a backyard pond (3 back) in which we used Hyacinths as our
predominant plant to control nutrients. We also pot planted some
Louisiana Iris in several places. We put in a dozen "feeder grade"
goldfish, about a dollar's worth. Of course both the Hyacinths and
the fish grew.

After the first year, we had to harvest and compost Hyacinths every
month or so during the summer. Finally, I tried a natural control
that a neighbor suggested. I grabbed a bucket of Duckweed from a
natural pond next door and dumped it in the upwind end of the pond.
The wind blew it up against the hyacinths and amazingly, it put
them in control. Our harvesting dropped back to just once or twice
a season (it's a 9 month season in S. Texas ). They just didn't
seem to want to grow against it, until the fish ate the Duckweed.

Then, of course, the neighborhood Great Blue Heron decided that the
pond was his private fishing hole and bagged a number of the fish
before we spotted him one night. Well, once again natural control
was the answer and we sent out the Lab to re-establish the
territorial pecking order. He became quite sensitive to the bird
problem and would even keep watch all night and whenever the Heron
showed up, he would wake us up rather enthusiastically to let us
know he needed to defend the pond.

The Duckweed however remained the silent control over the
Hyacinths. No one has been able to tell me why it works, but the
dreaded Hyacinths simply will not expand much against the Duckweed
barrier. Goldfish love it.

==


Answer #2>

Hi,

What a great story! I do believe in natural control and this
epitomizes that belief. I had no idea that hyacinths would be
controlled by duckweed.

So, for all the people out there suffering with duckweed, maybe you
need to give it something to "control"... then you'll appreciate it
better. And I am sure you have nice clear water under there.

I was also told by someone, not sure about the veracity of this
yet, that duckweed removes all oxygen from the water.

Does anybody know something technical about this and care to
comment?

Regards,
Carolyn


========== @SK Carolyn =================
Have a pond question? Just send it in
to: Carolyn@macarthurwatergardens.com
and our own in-house pond expert will
try and answer it for you! Write POND
in the subject line for quick response!
========================================


Happy Pondkeeping!

Brett Fogle
MacArthur Water Gardens
www.macarthurwatergardens.com

MacArthur Water Gardens
1698 SW 16th ST
Boca Raton, FL 33486


Posted by bfogle at 04:27 PM | Comments (0)

August 11, 2006

Filtration Systems / Those Pesky Predators

-------------------------------
Today's Pond Q&A

In this issue:

- Filtration Systems

- Those Pesky Predators

-----------------------------

Question #1>

Hi Carolyn,

I saw your duck question recently. I have a 15 x 15 pond with two
ducks. I also have two dogs and 15 chickens that drink out of the
pond.

Before I had the ducks, I had a pretty healthy bunch of lily pads.
I have had the ducks about a year. They pick through the lily
pads, but they do not tend to eat them.

I have a AquaMax pump and filter that does fine work with the
duck-debris (highly technical language), but the water is fairly
green.

I am hesitant to do your 25% weekly water replacement because I
live is Southern California, and I feel guilty about the water
usage. Anyways, you may want to suggest a "mature" lily pad
solution for duck-lovers.

Would the Microbe-lift do anything for my pea-soup colored water,
or is my only solution the 25% weekly water replacement?

Thanks.

==


Answer #1>

Hi,

Microbe-Lift will do a lot to remove the organic waste in the pond,
but a really strong filter with good mechanical filtration in
addition to the biological filter will be necessary. A friend of
mine with the turtle pond learned this lesson the hard way after
losing all his turtles to a bacterial infection. He now has a
state-of-the-art filtration system in place. It won't happen
again. The lily pads are not really "safe" from the ducks.
Eventually, or perhaps by a different species of duck, the lilies
will be devoured by them. I have always wanted to keep ducks, but
after seeing how much pollution they generate, I decided against
it. Koi are not much better, but I chose koi.

I understand the water rationing. Still, the solution to pollution
is dilution, so a bigger pond may be the answer if water changes
are not plausible.

Mechanical filtration would be a series of baffles, such as vortex
chambers, brushes and matala mats to trap progressively smaller
particles. This would clean the water of what we call inorganic
matter, the stuff that takes longer to break down, and leave the
actual chemical filtration and biological processing to the
bacteria. You can do a DIY with individual or partitioned
chambers, just as long as the water has to go THROUGH the filter
materials and not around it. By putting the pump at the end of the
mechanical stages you will be able to clean the water much better.
Clear water and clean water can be two different things. You may
already have very clean water but now let's work on the clear part.

If you aren't into a DIY filter, you can buy and install a retrofit
bottom drain, connect it to a vortex, going into a second vortex,
and perhaps follow that with a bubblebead filter. In the second
vortex, you can use the matala matting to catch particulate matter.

The trapped debris can be purged or washed out of the mats without
losing very much water. But if you do not get that debris out of
the pond system, you will not have any success in cleaning up the
pond. The water will naturally decline unless there is a way to
remove the pollutants at a rate equal to the rate it is building in
the pond.

Regards,
Carolyn


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Enter Your Pond in our 2006 Pond Galleria!
Just send us 4 or 5 good pictures of your backyard pond
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your pictures and a brief description to us at

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Question #2>

Hi Carolyn,

I built my first pond this past spring and have become completely
addicted. It is approximately 1200 gallons. I have 3 gold fish and
3 koi (approx. 6"). Up until the past few days everything has been
great.

My problem is 3 days ago one of the comet goldfish disappeared
overnight. I assumed a predator, because I have found no sign of
it. Now today I found one of my koi near death after seeming fine
this morning when I fed them.

I took it out and gave it a salt bath and have it in an isolation
tank. I see no obvious parasites although there are some scales
around the head than look "loose" and a little flaky. I treated
the pond with salt also.

What else should I do? It has been unusually hot here. Could that
be a problem? I am so attached to these silly fish, that I hate the
thought of losing them. any advice would be great.

==


Answer #2>

Hi,

It sounds more like a predator to me. If the pond isn't built with
steep sides that make it difficult for predators to catch fish,
then the obvious happens. Cats like to fish but rarely try to eat
what they catch. And these fish are friendly...

A low fence might thwart a fishing cat. Friends of mine swear by a
black netting that is strung around their pond, on small poles,
that is meant to deter raccoons and other small fishing pests. So
far it has worked.

Or, better yet, use that AND one of the motion sensor scarecrows sold
sold by MacArthur Water Gardens and I doubt you will lose any more fish.

Regards,
Carolyn


========== @SK Carolyn =================
Have a pond question? Just send it in
to: Carolyn@macarthurwatergardens.com
and our own in-house pond expert will
try and answer it for you! Write POND
in the subject line for quick response!
========================================


Happy Pondkeeping!

Brett Fogle
MacArthur Water Gardens
www.macarthurwatergardens.com

MacArthur Water Gardens
1698 SW 16th ST
Boca Raton, FL 33486

Posted by bfogle at 12:30 AM | Comments (0)

August 08, 2006

Worms in the Filter Matting? / Pond Problems Galore

-------------------------------
Today's Pond Q&A

In this issue:

- Worms in the Filter Matting?

- Pond Problems Galore

-----------------------------

Question #1>

Hi Carolyn,

I recently found my pond filters to be infested with a large number
of small 3/8" red worms.

Questions:

1 What are they?

2 How can I get rid of them without damage to my fish (shebunkins)

Thanks for your consideration

==

Answer #1>

Hi,

They are not harmful. They are either bloodworms or tubifex, both
types are the ones you would buy at a pet shop to feed to your
tropical fish. In fact, if you put the filter matting into the
pond, the fish would eat them for you.

When you say "infested" it sounds so nasty! Believe it or not
they are a natural inhabitant in a natural lake or pond, although
you will never see them. It's not until we put those lovely white
mats in that they are so prominently displayed. It makes a
wonderful colonization area for them. But they are somewhere in
the middle of the food chain. They are consuming smaller nematodes
and such. If you keep looking, you may even find small leeches.

If you get skeeved by these, I suggest you wear waterproof gloves
when handling the filter mats. Anything you use to kill them will
also harm the lower life forms that are responsible for keeping
your water clean. In order to control the populations, I would
recommend just changing the filter pads from time to time.

Regards,
Carolyn

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Question #2>

Hi Carolyn,

I have a small pond out back that I absolutely love. However, I have
had so many problems this year that I am going crazy!

First the string algae. I used EcoBlast and SAB Extreme and I
thought that took care of it. With the very strange weather we have
had, it is now back.

Next, my water is a dark brownish color. I used AquaClearer for
that but it hasn't touched it at all.

I also have a leak somewhere because the water level drops
considerably each day; not from evaporation. I have had the
BioFalls checked and it does not appear to be there.

Finally, I have a wild animal problem. I have now spent the time
and money and installed an electric fence (similar to a cow fence!)
around my adorable little pond!

It doesn't look bad and I don't even know yet if it is keeping the
raccoons, heron or whatever else is eating my fish, out!

Today 2 of my koi are missing but they could just be buried down
and because the clarity of the water is so bad, I can't see them!

Should I drain the entire pond and start all over == help!

==

Answer #2>

Hi,

You've come so far, don't quit now. The electric fence is the most
effective barrier against raccoon, mink, otter, but probably not
much good for heron. They will just step over it. For heron, you
need something taller and set up at varying heights to make it
difficult for the beasties to navigate so they will go elsewhere,
where it's easier to fish.

Now that you've tried all the chemical warfare, how about trying
water changes, 25% weekly, and bacteria? Do you have too many fish
in the pond? Too few plants? Are you feeding the fish too much?
Whether or not they eat it all, it is all going to be in the water
sooner or later and it has to go "somewhere" when it does.

It's possible the predator has poked a hole in the liner somewhere.
Turn off the pumps and let the water drain until it stops, while
watching so the fish don't wind up high and dry, of course. Where
the water stops, you will find your leak. Usually doesn't take
that long to find. Generally it is in the waterfall, so don't rule
it out entirely.

Regards,
Carolyn

========== @SK Carolyn =================
Have a pond question? Just send it in
to: Carolyn@macarthurwatergardens.com
and our own in-house pond expert will
try and answer it for you! Write POND
in the subject line for quick response!
========================================

Happy Pondkeeping!

Brett Fogle
MacArthur Water Gardens
www.macarthurwatergardens.com

MacArthur Water Gardens
1698 SW 16th ST
Boca Raton, FL 33486

Posted by bfogle at 10:56 PM | Comments (0)

August 03, 2006

Koi Pond Filtration / Koi in Hiding

-------------------------------
Today's Pond Q&A

In this issue:

- Koi Pond Filtration Problems

- Koi in Hiding

-----------------------------

Question #1>

Hi Carolyn,

I have a large Koi Pond. About 1500 Gals. I have a UV Filter
installed and it has done nothing. The pond is filthy. What else can
you recommend?

I feed the Koi twice a week. I have no way to drain the pond. I
did have a company come out but was very dissatisfied with their
service. They drained somewhat of the pond but never cleaned the
gook from the bottom. I did buy three fish that supposed to clean
the bottom? Any help I can get please advise.

Does your company sell a submersible pump and if so how much doe it
cost? Also the cost of Microbe-lift. How often should I feed the
Koi?

==

Answer #1>

Hi,

Do you have a filter on the pond? Do you have a bottom drain? Do
you have a big enough filter? Koi are pretty dirty fish and need a
lot of filtration. If you are feeding them, try cutting back on
the food. You also should be doing 25% water changes every week.
If the pond is unacceptable now, or at anytime, you can do a 50%
water change today and another 50% tomorrow. Always use
dechlorinator if there is any chance of chlorine or toxic metals in
the incoming water supply.

I suggest you buy a submersible pump specifically to pump out the
water from the dirtiest part of the pond for water changes, or you
can get a wet-dry shop vac to vacuum out the dirt, and just refill
with fresh water using dechlorinator. You should be doing this at
a rate of 25% weekly. Otherwise, the system is going to crash.
Microbe-Lift makes bacteria that will help biodegrade the organic
waste in the pond, but you still ought to have better filtration.

Check the products and prices on www.macarthurwatergardens.com or
go directly to these pages:
http://www.macarthurwatergardens.com/pumps/submersible_pond_pumps.htm

http://www.macarthurwatergardens.com/microbe-lift/microbe-lift-water-conditioners.shtml
Feeding the koi: feed only as much as they will consume in 5
minutes. Scoop any uneaten food out after 5 minutes. They are
small and do not need as much as you think. In fact, it will take
4 days for the food they eat today to leave their bodies. Most
people feed their fish 1-3 times a day, small amounts. Less is
more in the feeding department. If the pond starts to cloud up,
you are overfeeding them. Do a water change and cut back on
feeding.

Regards,
Carolyn

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Question #2>

Hi Carolyn,

I have about 5 koi fish in my pond and they were swimming about all
day from one side of my pond to another. The past week or so the
fish are hiding on one side of the pond by a rock and they're not
swimming around the pond. They are also barely eating.

What do you think is the problem with these fish?

If i move them with my hose they'll swim around that area and go
right back to that spot. Please inform me with your opinion.

Thank you.

==

Answer #2>

Hi,

It sounds like they are being terrorized during the night. Perhaps
you have raccoons visiting the pond when you aren't looking.
Predators will scare fish badly and they will act much like this.

Do a water change and test the parameters to make sure it is not
something in the water first, but you might need to watch the pond
closely for a while.

If it is predators, something that helps is to float styrofoam on
the top for shelter. You can buy sheets of styrofoam at Home
Depot. I presume you have Home Depot in your area, no?

Regards,
Carolyn

========== @SK Carolyn =================
Have a pond question? Just send it in
to: Carolyn@macarthurwatergardens.com
and our own in-house pond expert will
try and answer it for you! Write POND
in the subject line for quick response!
========================================

Happy Pondkeeping!

Brett Fogle
MacArthur Water Gardens
www.macarthurwatergardens.com
MacArthur Water Gardens
1698 SW 16th ST
Boca Raton, FL 33486

Posted by bfogle at 09:49 PM | Comments (1)

August 01, 2006

Tadpoles / Removing Algae

-------------------------------
Today's Pond Q&A

In this issue:

- Tadpoles

- Removing Algae

-----------------------------

Question #1>


Hi Carolyn,

I have a small (100 gallons) Koi pond. By using the proper pond
clarifier and algae-fix bought from you, the water reaches a stable
level of clarity.

Lately at around 3 or 4 am I heard frogs (or toads?) making loud
noise around the pond area, and when morning comes I found a lot of
eggs being laid on the surface of the water.

Is there any effective way to get rid of these eggs or frogs ?

Thank You.

==


Answer #1>

Hi,

Now, why would you want to get rid of the eggs?? These are probably
the best bug eaters money can buy and you are getting them for
free. They can be very endearing too.

Seriously, they aren't going to remain in the pond and not all the
tadpoles will live to maturity. If you have fish in the pond, some
of the tadpoles may be a choice morsel.

When the mosquitoes and gnats are out and biting you, you'll wish
you had those beasties.

Regards,
Carolyn


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Question #2>

Hi Carolyn,

I live in Northern Ontario and so always bring the fish in for the
winter. This year we put them back in the pond and although
everyone survived the move the pond has become slimier than normal.

The water is clear as we use a uv light and also a large rock and
fibre filter yet more algae is growing on the bottom, sides and
even on the rocks of the waterfall than last year.

Any suggestions on how to safely remove the algae without
disturbing the fish?

Thanks

==


Answer #2>

Hi,

The algae won't hurt the fish. Many ponds are experiencing more
than usual algal growth this year due to a mild winter followed by
a very warm spring in most of the US, not sure what the weather has
done up there, but can't be that different, just cooler.

I would recommend keeping the filter and pond as clean as possible,
doing water changes weekly, 25%, and keeping in mind that those
fish have grown since last spring, 2005, so the pond is not the
same this year.

In order to reduce the nutrients that algae need to thrive you will
need to monitor your feeding regimen. Less is better in most
cases.

Besides the water changes and sensible feeding, you can use Barley
Straw Pellets to bind the nitrates and phosphates. You also may
look at adding more plants to the pond.

Regards,
Carolyn


========== @SK Carolyn =================
Have a pond question? Just send it in
to: Carolyn@macarthurwatergardens.com
and our own in-house pond expert will
try and answer it for you! Write POND
in the subject line for quick response!
========================================


Happy Pondkeeping!

Brett Fogle
MacArthur Water Gardens
www.macarthurwatergardens.com

MacArthur Water Gardens
1698 SW 16th ST
Boca Raton, FL 33486

Posted by bfogle at 05:16 PM | Comments (12711)