June 29, 2015

Products for Fishless Ponds / Leeches in Pond Systems

-------------------------------
Today's Pond Q&A

In this issue:

- Products for Fishless Ponds

- Leeches in Pond Systems

-----------------------------

Question #1>


Hi Carolyn,

I read your e-mail with great interest but if I may, I would like to
make an observation.

I notice that most of your advice in the use of certain chemicals
and water treatments are geared to people who have fish in their
ponds. In view of the long winters and the problems of having fish
that I wish to avoid, I do not have any fish in my pond.

I would like to know what products are best for me to use in a
fishless pond. We do have a number of frogs that find their way
into our pond but that's the only living creatures, other than some
lily pads and plants, we have in our pond.

I will appreciate it if you will address one of your e-mails that
includes your recommendations for maintaining a fishless pond.

Thanks
Joe


==


Answer #1>

Well, Joe, I thought you'd never ask!

A fishless pond it is.

Believe it or not, I would recommend much of the same additives for
the water, such as Microbe-Lift/PL which is the one that will
establish and maintain good balance of nutrients in the water
column. It will increase available oxygen to the water because the
bacteria is photosynthetic, drawing reserves from the sunlight.
Clean water is what you would want in a pond whether you have fish
or not. Nobody wants a smelly pool of water in their yard, do
they?

The Microbe-Lift company also has a mosquito larva control that is
very effective also, and safe for the frogs, pets, wildlife and
humans. It just kills the targeted insect larvae. It's called
ML/Biological Mosquito Control.

One more thing? For the health of the plants, instead of
fertilizing them (and promoting algae) I recommend using another
Microbe-Lift product, Ensure, that will stimulate strong root and
stem growth. And of course, in the fall they have Autumn Winter
Prep which is an enzyme product in water soluble packets to
biodegrade any leaf matter that has blown into your pond.
http://www.macarthurwatergardens.com/microbe-lift/microbe-lift-PL.shtml


Regards,
Carolyn


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Question #2>

Hi Carolyn,

We have a small pond with a waterfall and fish.

This year I have noticed that the rocks in the waterfall are
covered with very tiny black clingy wormlike creatures. They are
about this __ big. I don't know if they will harm the fish, and
what can I do to get rid of them. Any information would be
greatly appreciated.

Thanks!
Lynn

==

Answer #2>

Hi, Lynn,

They may be leeches, but I wouldn't be concerned about them harming
the fish. They are ubiquitous in pond systems, even though we
don't want to know about them, and if the fish are able to reach
them, they will become additional protein for your fish. They are
most often found in the filter matting.

I have no idea how they get there, but they always seem to be. They
don't seem to do any harm and there isn't any way to eliminate them
without killing off the beneficial bacteria and other beneficial
life forms.

Regards,
Carolyn


========== @SK Carolyn =================
Have a pond question? Just send it in
to: Carolyn@macarthurwatergardens.com
and our own in-house pond expert will
try and answer it for you! Write POND
in the subject line for quick response!
========================================


Happy Pondkeeping!

Brett Fogle
MacArthur Water Gardens
www.macarthurwatergardens.com

© MacArthur Water Gardens
PO Box 3628
Alpharetta, GA 30023-3628


Posted by bfogle at 11:42 PM | Comments (1)

June 27, 2015

Fish Dietary Needs / Pea Soup Algae

-------------------------------
Today's Pond Q&A

In this issue:

- Fish Dietary Needs

- Pea Soup Algae

-----------------------------

Question #1>

Hi Carolyn,

I have a 1 yr old pond about 200 gal. I have 11 goldfish 4
bluegills (recently added) and a couple frogs... we really enjoy
sitting and watching the fish...

I feed them Tetra Pond, pond fish food and they have grown a lot
since last year... I feed them and the frogs worms occasionally but
they are probably eating the fish food also....

My Question is could I feed them something else occasionally, like
cheerios or corn flakes or corn meal? Just thought they might like
a change of diet occasionally......

==

Answer #1>

Hi

Some fish will do well with fruits and vegetables, but with a pond
that size I would use extreme caution in putting things in that may
not be consumed.

You should stick to the proven diets and make sure it is all being
eaten or you will have problems with water quality. When the water
quality declines, the fish will suffer quickly. It's not really
worth it.

If you really want a varied diet, Microbe-Lift Legacy foods have
Crustacean, Kelp and Krill treats with a very nutritious
formulation for the pampered pets in your pond. They also make a
Fruits & Greens food.

Regards,
Carolyn

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Question #2>

Hi Carolyn,

I have a 3000 gal pond with two 2000 gal biofalls that circulate the
entire pond 1 1/2 times per hour. I have a serious pea soup algae
problem that nothing seems to be able to clear up.

I have plenty of plants to fight it for nutrients and have added
bacteria on a daily basis. I have tried an entire bottle of Microbe
Lift and seen no results.

The water quality is excellent with no ammonia or nitrates and the
fish (which there are 5 koi and 100's of mosquito fish) seem to be
fat and healthy when I do manage to get a glimpse of them. I have
not fed them for a week in the process of trying to clear up the
pond but so far I have seen no change.

Is UV filtration my only option if I want to see my fish? And will
UV have any effect on my water quality?

Please help me see my fish again.

Tamara Wise


Answer #2>

Hi, Tamara,

First, I hope you mean nitrites, as there are always nitrates in a
pond. Zero ammonia and nitrites would be good, but zero nitrates
means there is something wrong with your testing methods.

Apparently, with no ammonia and no nitrites, the Microbe-lift
bacteria is working for you. However, algae thrive on nitrates and
phosphates, just like any other plant.

Are you doing weekly water changes? You should be doing 25% and
adding a dechlorinator before putting in new water. This will
reduce the amount of available nutrients in the water.

When the UV light kills the algae, it is the bacteria that will
break it down and remove it along with the other organic waste
products. Check out UV's at
http://www.macarthurwatergardens.com/Aqua-Ultraviolet/Aqua-uv-menu.shtml

A UV light would be quite effective in removing the offensive pea
soup-type algae. In addition, you could try using Barley Straw
Pellets or Barley Straw Extract to sequester the pesky nutrients
while waiting for the water changes.

Regards,
Carolyn


========== @SK Carolyn =================
Have a pond question? Just send it in
to: Carolyn@macarthurwatergardens.com
and our own in-house pond expert will
try and answer it for you! Write POND
in the subject line for quick response!
========================================

Happy Pondkeeping!

Brett Fogle
MacArthur Water Gardens
www.macarthurwatergardens.com

© MacArthur Water Gardens
PO Box 3628
Alpharetta, GA 30023-3628


Posted by bfogle at 08:45 PM | Comments (0)

June 23, 2015

Green Water / Getting Rid of Soil

-------------------------------
Today's Pond Q&A

In this issue:

- Green Water

- Getting Rid of Soil

-----------------------------

Question #1>


Hi Carolyn,

My pond has fibrous algae,not string algae. How do you get rid of
green water?

I have a 4000 gallon pond, and a biological filtration system. We
have scrubbies in the waterfall, filter, and skimmer. We have a
filter also and scrubbies and then we have a filter hooked up to
the pump in the skimmer. I clean the filters out every day and put
them back in place.

I also have water lettuce and water hyacinth to help filter the
pond.

We used Pondworks Biobalance but we can't get it right now. It
really helped to keep the water clear by seeding the biofilter
and removing the suspended algae.

Is there another product you would recommend to use and if so what?

Thanks,
Belinda


==


Answer #1>

Hi Belinda,

Green water, or Planktonic Algae, is the type that is best removed
by a UV light. Is there any way for you to add one to your system?

Bacterial additives are great, and should be added, but their
primary job isn't to kill algae. They will balance the nutrient
levels in the pond so that algae won't be such a problem and they
will remove dead algae along with other organic waste matter, but
they aren't supposed to kill any living things, including algae.
Your best bet is to use a UV light and the bacteria.

Microbe-Lift/PL Gel can be added directly to the scrubbies to
colonize quickly wherever you place it. It is grown in a polymer
solution so it "sticks" to whatever you want. They also make a
Microbe-Lift/Super Start specifically for bubblebead filters which
would probably work well with your system too. But the ML/PL will
work quite well.

Regards,
Carolyn


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Question #2>

Hi Carolyn,

Could you please tell me how to clear soil from my water? I had a few
plants that were over taking me half barrel, and now it looks as
though I've pulled all the soil up with them!

I've tried putting clean water in it, l have a bio filter, and I'm
having to clean the sponge 2-3 times a day, also a small pump that
keep getting clogged. would be grateful for any solutions.

Thanks,
Dee

==

Answer #2>

Hello Dee

That's the problem with using soil in water garden pots. I always
recommend soil-less mixes for water garden plants. In this case,
it sounds like the water changes, or a pond vacuum, will be the only way
to remove it entirely.

Plants do not need soil in a water garden. They will extract all
the nutrients necessary straight from the water. All they need is
something to anchor them to the pot. So, you can use sand, stone
or pebbles. Microbe-Lift makes a Concentrated Aquatic Planting
Media which is precolonized with nitrifying bacteria and kiln fired
so not to break down in the water. Nothing to dirty up the place
if it gets kicked over.

Regards,
Carolyn


========== @SK Carolyn =================
Have a pond question? Just send it in
to: Carolyn@macarthurwatergardens.com
and our own in-house pond expert will
try and answer it for you! Write POND
in the subject line for quick response!
========================================


Happy Pondkeeping!

Brett Fogle
MacArthur Water Gardens
www.macarthurwatergardens.com

© MacArthur Water Gardens
PO Box 3628
Alpharetta, GA 30023-3628

Posted by bfogle at 12:50 AM | Comments (1)

June 20, 2015

String Algae / Too Many Goldfish?

-------------------------------
Today's Pond Q&A

In this issue:

- String Algae

- Too Many Goldfish?

-----------------------------

Question #1>


Hi Carolyn,

Every summer we get this black muck in our waterfall. The water is
crystal clear because I have alot of water lilies in the pond. I
have only used Algaefix once this season and have put bacteria in
it also.

What can I do to prevent this from happening every year?

Linda

==

Answer #1>

Hi Linda,

That black muck is a type of string algae, but you need to know that
every time you use an algaecide you kill off 80% of the beneficial
bacteria in the pond. I think that starts more trouble than it
cures.

There is a product called Accu-Clear that will clean it up
beautifully.

You have to remember to add a LOT of aeration whenever killing
algae, in any manner, because it will result in oxygen depletion
and a major fish kill.

GreenClean will also work extremely well, and can be used right on
the waterfall (with the water off temporarily) as a spot treatment.
Again, use sparingly and add lots of aeration no matter what you
do if you value your fish.

Other than this, you can add Microbe-Lift PL to balance the
nutrients in the pond and perhaps remove some of the algae fuel.

Something else that might even be more productive would be to stick
sprigs of water cress or parrot feather in the waterfall. The
algae will not be able to compete.

Regards,
Carolyn


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Question #2>

Hi Carolyn,

I have a pond that is 10' X10' X3.5' deep. I have 45 gold fish in
the pond? Is this too many fish for the pond. I have two large
filters in the pond but have to clean them every three days.

D.D.

==

Answer #2>

Hello D.D.

If it looks like a crowd, it is too many fish. Goldfish can grow to
a good size and need room. They also proliferate with abandon.

When a pond gets crowded, fish become stressed and begin to develop
a myriad of disease problems. Parasite infestation becomes
epidemic in fish-filled ponds. Bacterial infection is difficult to
control. Fish will die in warmer weather from lack of sufficient
oxygen in the water.

In my estimation, a good practice would be to cull, or find new
homes for, in other words, about half these fish annually. And I
would start this year.

Regards,
Carolyn


========== @SK Carolyn =================
Have a pond question? Just send it in
to: Carolyn@macarthurwatergardens.com
and our own in-house pond expert will
try and answer it for you! Write POND
in the subject line for quick response!
========================================


Happy Pondkeeping!

Brett Fogle
MacArthur Water Gardens
www.macarthurwatergardens.com
© MacArthur Water Gardens
PO Box 3628
Alpharetta, GA 30023-3628


Posted by bfogle at 11:05 PM | Comments (1)

June 17, 2015

Water Lily Pests/Strange Koi Behavior

-------------------------------
Today's Pond Q&A

In this issue:

- Water Lily Pests

- Strange Koi Behavior

-----------------------------

Question #1>

Hi Carolyn,

I have white moths and worms on my water lily leaves. The worms are
the ones that eat two circles and sandwich between the two to float
to other plants.

I was told to use mosquito dunks. I am also hand picking them
twice a day but they are ahead of me. We have turned off the night
lights so as not to draw in the moths but have some light from
neighbors.

Is there some spray I can use that will not harm the fish or frogs?
We have gold fish and lots of tadpoles.


==


Answer #1>

Hi,

What you described is China mark moth. It is particularly
destructive to water lilies. A natural control for these awful
pests is Bacillus var. kurstaki (Btk), which is the active
ingredient in caterpillar attack.

Find out what is in the mosquito dunk and if it contains Btk, then
use it. If not, it won't help. Turning the light off won't help.
Eventually the moths will turn your lilies into cole slaw.


Regards,
Carolyn

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Question #2>

Hi Carolyn

I have a small problem that you might be able to help me with in my
pond. I have a 18 month old koi, about five inches long, and it is
behaving rather strangely at times. I find it at the surface on its
side. The first time i thought it was dead, but as I reached out to
pick it up it went off like a rocket.

It nearly smashes into things but it doesn't. It swims alot on
its side. At times it acts normal but mainly it swims on its side.
It 1s funny, sometimes it looks like it's doing acrobatics in the
water!

What could it be, because it is the only one out of thirty fish
behaving this way. The pH is good and the water temp at the moment
is about 15 degrees in Sydney, Australia. I hope to be sending you
some pictures of my pond.

Thank you

==

Answer #2>

Hi,

As long as it is only one fish that is acting peculiarly, then I
wouldn't suspect the water chemistry. I suspect the fish has a
problem and would like to see it scraped, gill snipped, and
quarantined before you start to see the rest of your fish acting in
this manner.

Every fish has its own personality, just like humans, however this
sounds like more than personality, it sounds like the fish is
suffering. Does the fish look "normal" in other respects? Being
it is 5", and a youngster, it may be insecure, however the swimming
on its side might indicate swim bladder problems. You need to find
out if the young fellow has parasites or disease before it gets out
of hand.

Oh, and please don't treat the pond with chemicals unless you know
what you are treating for, okay?

Regards,
Carolyn


========== @SK Carolyn =================
Have a pond question? Just send it in
to: Carolyn@macarthurwatergardens.com
and our own in-house pond expert will
try and answer it for you! Write POND
in the subject line for quick response!
========================================


Happy Pondkeeping!

Brett Fogle
MacArthur Water Gardens
www.macarthurwatergardens.com

© MacArthur Water Gardens
PO Box 3628
Alpharetta, GA 30023-3628


Posted by bfogle at 02:19 AM | Comments (2)

June 13, 2015

Algae / Timid Koi

-------------------------------
Today's Pond Q&A

In this issue:

- Algae

- Timid Koi

-----------------------------

Question #1>


Hi Carolyn,

I've had my pond going now for 1 1/2 months and now have algae, the
type that clings to the sides and bottom and is green. Is this gonna
continue growing? Would this mean my UV is not working properly?

This year I have added a waterfall as well as a fountain. They are
both small. My pond is 6 x 10 x 18 inches deep. I also have a Koi
and 2 gold fish.

Last summer was really good. After installing the UV it took the
green water out completely and I didn't have the algae problem.

Would there be a book or guide to help us along with all these
questions?

==


Answer #1>

Hi,

Now, to answer some questions, the algae you described isn't
affected by the UV. The only algae that will be eliminated by a UV
is Planktonic, or single-celled algae that will go through the UV
unit. What you have this year is stationary in the pond. There
are many, many different types of algae.

Algae needs only nutrients, sunlight and sufficient temperature to
grow in water. In case you didn't think about it, seaweed is
another form of algae too. So, even salt won't cure algae. My
guess is the fish are growing, or have grown since last year, even
if ever so slightly, and are adding more organic waste to the
system.

Algae thrives on fish offings, such as ammonia, nitrate and
phosphate. It also loves the carbon dioxide the fish give off.
So, unless you have a lot of plants to take up these nutrients
which abound in a pond, you need to expect algae. In fact, algae
can be considered the weed in your water garden. Like the weeds in
your other gardens, it is hardier than the selective or hybridized
plants. Best bet is to shade the pond and keep it very clean. If
the filter doesn't do the job, get a pond vacuum. I believe
MacArthur Water Gardens sells them.
http://www.macarthurwatergardens.com/pond-vacs/pond-vacs.shtml

There are a number of good books out there, including the Pond Doctor
by Helen Nash, http://www.macarthurwatergardens.com/Books/books.htm,
but I also advise joining a water garden club.

Regards,
Carolyn


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Would you like to comment on these Pond Q&A's?
Visit our BLOG at www.macarthurwatergardens.com/BLOG
and post your feedback, stories, comments, etc... We've
also posted all previous Pond Q&A's there for your review!
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Question #2>

Hi Carolyn

I don't know if you can help but I have a Koi question. I recently
enlarged my pond from 500 to 2,000 gallons. I put six new 3" Koi
in it. That was three weeks ago. I saw them the first couple
days, but they would always hide when they saw me.

Now I can't see to the bottom and haven't seen the fish in over 2
weeks. I'm worried that they're not eating. I have put Koi food in
but no nibbles.

When it was enlarged I had two frogs in it. They laid eggs and I
had a ton of pollywogs. I looked last night and couldn't find any
pollywogs left. Could the fish be eating them? If not how do I
get them to not be so skittish and eat?


==

Answer #2>

Hi,

Those fish are just babies, in a new place, and it is very normal
that they are timid. Many fish predators are airborne and so if you
are standing above them, they should be afraid. It will take a few
months for them to start to recognize you. Koi actually learn who
their owners are in time.

I wouldn't push the food on them. They are probably eating the
algae. But if you are throwing food in, hoping they eat, you may
be ruining your water quality rather than doing any good for the
fish.

As for the tadpoles, no, the fish aren't eating them, or vice
versa. They both may be existing on the algae right now.

Do you have any larger koi in there? Generally a large friendly
fish will coax them out of hiding and up for food.

Regards,
Carolyn


========== @SK Carolyn =================
Have a pond question? Just send it in
to: Carolyn@macarthurwatergardens.com
and our own in-house pond expert will
try and answer it for you! Write POND
in the subject line for quick response!
========================================


Happy Pondkeeping!

Brett Fogle
MacArthur Water Gardens
www.macarthurwatergardens.com

© MacArthur Water Gardens
PO Box 3628
Alpharetta, GA 30023-3628


Posted by bfogle at 10:35 PM | Comments (1)

June 08, 2015

Ponds on Raised Decks/Diagnosing Fish Loss

-------------------------------
Today's Pond Q&A

In this issue:

- Ponds on Raised Decks

- Diagnosing Fish Loss

-----------------------------

Question #1>


Hi Carolyn,

I need some help. I just moved into a new home and had a beautiful
pond built into my ground level deck. I currently have my fish in a
pre-fab pond awaiting their new home.

Here is my problem: I have a beautiful 80ft. deck that runs the
length of my house except that it is a raised deck, well fortified by
two 2"x12" and double bolted into the side of the house. Due to the
slope of my backyard a pond is not possible in the yard.

I want to put a pond on this raised deck but need some suggestions
as to how to start. I also can't have a pond more than 24" deep by
local ordinance or otherwise it becomes a pool and requires
fencing. Thoughts, can fish winter in a 24" pond? What's the
biggest deck pond you have heard of or seen?


==


Answer #1>

Hi,

I have seen some ponds built half above ground and half in-ground to
accommodate a deck behind a house. These would be on hilly
property, of course. I hope the deck is not made of treated lumber
because I recently received another call from someone who lost
their fish due to arsenic poisoning from their deck runoff.

There are many ways to prevent a pond from freezing completely,
such as using circulator pumps and de-icers. You might even look
into covering the pond with a solar pool cover. In this way, the
fish should be able, depending upon your locality and frost-depth,
to survive a winter in 24" water.

I might also suggest you do not stock koi. Koi are not as tolerant
of lower temperatures as other carp and they become too large for a
shallow pond.

My recommendation is to research what you can legally get away with
and make it the maximum size for your area. Short of that, I can't
really offer any help.

Regards,
Carolyn


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Would you like to comment on these Pond Q&A's?
Visit our BLOG at www.macarthurwatergardens.com/BLOG
and post your feedback, stories, comments, etc... We've
also posted all previous Pond Q&A's there for your review!
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Question #2>

Hi Carolyn

Since late spring I have been losing fish. The fish appears to be
healthy and eating, then suddenly dies overnight. I noticed on
most of the fish that they are missing scales in a small area.

Do you have any idea what is causing this and how I can stop this
problem? This seems to affect my koi and not the comets or
shubukins. I had my water tested and it was ok.

Thanks
Debbie

==

Answer #2>

Hi, Debbie,

Without seeing them and doing a scraping with a microscope, I am
only guessing. Also, I am not a veterinarian, but I have some
ideas as to what is going on.

Koi are more sensitive to parasites than goldfish. In fact,
goldfish are hardier in most situations, including dirty water, so
the koi will suffer first as a rule.

What it sounds like to me is the fish may be rubbing on rocks or
something in the pond, and knocking off scales in the process,
because of parasites biting them. They could have internal
bacterial infections which you can't see with the naked eye, or
they may be dying from some other toxic condition in the water.

I would recommend having the water tested by a lab to find out what
is in there first. When you had the water tested, did you have it
tested just for pH, ammonia, nitrites, and nitrates? If so, we
need to find out if there is copper or arsenic in there. Do you
have any treated lumber by the pond?

I would also like to see you take a fish (or 2-3 fish) to someone
who can do a scraping and gill snip. If this is not possible, the
next fish that dies, please put it in the freezer and call Vicki
Vaughan at the Koi Lab, Athens, GA, about having the fish checked
by them. They will do a necropsy at an affordable price. You can
go to their website www.koilab.com for directions. Then we will
have something to go on and can hopefully save the rest. I do not
believe in treating a pond unless I have diagnosed a problem.

Regards,
Carolyn


========== @SK Carolyn =================
Have a pond question? Just send it in
to: Carolyn@macarthurwatergardens.com
and our own in-house pond expert will
try and answer it for you! Write POND
in the subject line for quick response!
========================================


Happy Pondkeeping!

Brett Fogle
MacArthur Water Gardens
www.macarthurwatergardens.com

© MacArthur Water Gardens
PO Box 3628
Alpharetta, GA 30023-3628

Posted by bfogle at 09:15 PM | Comments (1)

June 07, 2015

Pondstuff 5/31/06 Clarification: Adding Fish to Your Pond

NOTE TO READERS:

In the PONDSTUFF! 5/31/06 edition there is something I would like
to clarify.

When bringing home new fish, IF THE FISH HAS SPENT 3+ HOURS IN
THE BAG, do not add any pond water to the bag with the fish.
Although for a brief trip home with a new fish this may not be a
problem, a long journey will present a very different challenge
for the fish. While in the bag, the fish is giving off ammonia.

Normally, after a while in the bag the fish would die of
ammonia poisoning. However, a curious thing occurs. The fish
also gives off carbon dioxide which combines with hydrogen ions
in the water to lower the pH. As the pH declines, so does the
toxicity of ammonia! A fish can remain safely in the carry-bag
for a long period of time therefore.

Now, when you arrive home, simply float the bag on the water to
acclimate to the temperature of the pond. Then open the bag and
lift the fish out. Place the fish into the fresh water with NO
water exchange whatsoever. If you add pond water to the bag you
will effectively raise the pH and the ammonia that has built up
will now become toxic, burning the fish's gills or killing it
outright. More often the fish takes anywhere from a few days to
a few months to die a slow painful death. So, we do NOT
recommend that you allow any water exchange if the fish has been
in the bag for a long trip, okay?

Carolyn Weise
MacArthur Water Gardens

Posted by bfogle at 04:25 PM | Comments (1)

Catfish / Finding Leaks

-------------------------------
Today's Pond Q&A

In this issue:

- Are Catfish Dangerous?

- Finding Leaks

-----------------------------

Question #1>


Hi Carolyn,

I've got two one-foot long catfish with yellow tops, white
bottoms, and milky white whiskers in my pond. They were 2
inches when I put them in last fall. Now they come to the top
and seem very, very aggressive and act like vacuum cleaners.
They are very fast and eat everything in sight very rapidly. Are
they a danger to other fish? Should I get rid of them?

Help….


==


Answer #1>

Hi,

Oh, yes, they are a danger to anything that will fit into their
big mouths. Catfish have big appetites and not particular as to
what is on the menu. If it fits, it eats it. How do you
suppose it got that big? Yep, your other fish are now on the
menu.

Regards,
Carolyn


_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/
Enter Your Pond for our 'Pond of the Month' Contest!
Just send us several good pictures of your backyard
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Question #2>

Dear Carolyn,

They say to add milk to pond and it will show you where the leak
is. Can you do this with the fish still in the pond?


==

Answer #2>

Hello,

Milk? That's a great question. But I don't see myself putting
milk into my pond nohow. I would prefer to shut down the
system, and you can leave a bubbler on for the fish, and stay
there to watch as the water drains out. I say to stay there in
case the leak is on the bottom, but as a rule it is in the
waterfall or skimmer.

Some people install their own ponds and put in bottom drains...
and put them in incorrectly, so the bottom drain, if it leaked,
would be disastrous. There is almost no way to be sure of
correcting a leak if it is the bottom drain. A new liner would
be in order. However, the usual leaks are nearer the surface so
when the water levels out, stops leaking out, just look all
around the water line and you will find it. IF, when you shut
down the waterfall, the leak stops, look no further.

I'd say to forget about the milk. And the fish might not be
harmed by it, but they are not able to live in milk. They are
used to living in water. Most leaks can be found in the
waterfalls.


Regards,
Carolyn


========== @SK Carolyn =================
Have a pond question? Just send it in
to: Carolyn@macarthurwatergardens.com
and our own in-house pond expert will
try and answer it for you! Write POND
in the subject line for quick response!
========================================


Happy Pondkeeping!

Brett Fogle
MacArthur Water Gardens
www.macarthurwatergardens.com

© MacArthur Water Gardens
PO Box 3628
Alpharetta, GA 30023-3628

Posted by bfogle at 12:27 AM | Comments (0)

June 01, 2015

Putting Fish Back in Pond / Oxygen Problems

-------------------------------
Today's Pond Q&A

In this issue:

- Putting Fish Back in Pond

- Fish & Oxygen Problems

-----------------------------

Question #1>


Hi Carolyn,

Can you tell me the best time to put my fish back in my pond?

At present I have had them in a tank 4ftxlong x2ft wide to keep
them away from the ice and cold as it's been -5. I have 3 koi
4inches long. I hope it was ok to keep them inside for a few
months. The temperature has been 18 degrees.


==


Answer #1>

Hi,

Sounds like you did the right thing by bringing these babies in
for the winter. Fish under 8" do best to overwinter indoors.
As for returning to the pond, there are a lot of variables here.

First and foremost is your area temperatures and weather. I
tell people to wait until all threat of frost is past which is
generally around the end of May in the lower New York areas
(zone 7).

Another variable is the size and condition of your pond. A
large pond will have more stable temperatures. A small one will
heat and cool rapidly, which is bad for fish and creates stress.
Stressed fish usually become sick.

Another variable is the care they are receiving indoors- if they
are eating they will be entering a pond and emitting ammonia.
You will need to have the filter ready for them. Is your
outside pond clean and ready to receive the fish?

Well, I think that's about it. Good luck. Let us know how they
make out.

Regards,
Carolyn


_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/
Enter Your Pond for our 'Pond of the Month' Contest!
Just send us several good pictures of your backyard
pond paradise, and if you win -- we'll feature you on
our website! Send your pictures and a brief description
to us at lane@macarthurwatergardens.com
_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/


Question #2>

Dear Carolyn,

I have noted recently that my Koi are gathering around the
waterfall and appear to be "woofing" the bubbles. It usually
occurs in the morning. Does this sound like a lack of oxygen?

I am of the opinion that they are not getting sufficient oxygen.
I have tested the oxygen in the water and it is usually between
3-5 mg/l.

My pond is 4000 gals 26' x 12' , depth 3 1/2 - 4'. The Koi are
content and hardy otherwise. The pond has been established for
five years, with most of the 25 Koi in the 30-36" range.

Do I need a air diffuser w/pump to ensure there is no lack of
oxygen? I would appreciate hearing WISE words from you Carolyn.
Many thanks and keep up the wonderful work you are doing!


==

Answer #2>

Hello,

First, it sounds like the fish might be having some difficulty at
that time of day. In the morning, if there are either plants or
algae in the pond, the pH will have been affected during the
night and this might be the primary problem. Have you tested
the pH?

I also wonder if your pond looks crowded? It is easy to
consider a pond "safe" because it is a mature pond, but in fact
the fish continue to grow each year. A fish that increases in
length will almost double in girth and weight, so your bioload
might be too much this year.

I don't know what part of the world you are in, or how warm it
is, but most of the US is still having cold nights, and cold
water holds oxygen well. It isn't until the water warms to
around 80F that things get sticky and the oxygen becomes scarce.
Forgive me if you are in a warm climate and this doesn't apply.

If the water temperatures were up and the oxygen was being
depleted, I suspect the fish would be stressed during the day
and not just in the morning. That's why I suspect pH
fluctuations. Also, when pH is raised, that makes the ammonia
levels more toxic to fish. I hope you are doing water testing
for pH, Ammonia, Nitrites and Nitrates.

Now, the other cause of oxygen depravation: gill flukes! You
need to be able to check a gill scraping under a microscope to
see what might be there. If the fishes' gills are impaired in
any way, including chlorine burn, the fish will die of
asphyxiation.

Regards,
Carolyn


========== @SK Carolyn =================
Have a pond question? Just send it in
to: Carolyn@macarthurwatergardens.com
and our own in-house pond expert will
try and answer it for you! Write POND
in the subject line for quick response!
========================================


Happy Pondkeeping!

Brett Fogle
MacArthur Water Gardens
www.macarthurwatergardens.com

© MacArthur Water Gardens
PO Box 3628
Alpharetta, GA 30023-3628

Posted by bfogle at 05:44 PM | Comments (0)