April 27, 2015

Tannins/Sand Filter/Spring Cleaning

-------------------------------
Today's Pond Q&A

In this issue:

- Tannins/Sand Filter

- Spring Cleaning

-----------------------------

Question #1>

Carolyn, I have 2 questions:

1. Our pond is turning yellow/brown due to live oak leaves from
a tree in the same courtyard that we can't seem to keep out
despite manually skimming 2-3 times per day in addition to our
Atlantic skimmer.

Is there any cure once the darn tree quits dropping leaves and
pollen? Water changes will be quite a chore, but not
impossible. Any type of chemical that will precipitate the
tannins?

2. I have a sand filter from a pool that I tried and it didn't
work well. Can I buy just the Aquabead material to replace the
sand? The filter is about 30 inches in diameter.

Thanks,
Tom

==

Answer #1>

Hi Tom,

The way to remove tannins is with activated carbon. In fact,
that and water changes are the only way I know.

As for the filter, I've been asked many times about replacing
the contents of a sand filter with other material and it simply
won't work. There isn't enough room inside to fit what is
needed to make it functional.

The reason sand works so well for pools is all that chlorine,
but we can't add chlorine to a pond. Sand clogs up too quickly
and needs too much maintenance to make it work for ponds. And
if not cared for properly can become anaerobic or even toxic in
time.

Why not just go get the bubblebead?
http://www.macarthurwatergardens.com/biological.shtml


Regards,
Carolyn


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Question #2>

Hi Carolyn,

The ice in the pond is finally gone, my pond is 10' x 6' x 18"
deep and living in New Brunswick, Canada the pond froze over
solid, sure glad my fish were inside.

Anyway my question is, should I drain the whole thing out, or
could I just scrape the debris on the bottom and leave what has
built up on the sides?

I'm afraid to put my pump with filter and U V filter. I have
taken out some of the debris but can't get to everything. Hoping
you can give me some advice and sure enjoy your Q & A

Thanks

==

Answer #2>

Hi,

I think it would be safest to do a thorough water change. Yes,
definitely clean all the stuff on the bottom.

It's only the top 6" or so that gets enough oxygen and sunlight
to support the aerobic bacteria, but there's something else that
goes on in the anaerobic layers of a filter or pond.

Nitrification and denitrification are a two step process for the
beneficial bacteria. So, I wouldn't scrape the bottom, but
would give it a good cleaning of anything that can be removed
before returning the filter system and fish.

I'd run the system for a week before bringing the fish out to
their "summer camp" pond. I recommend using dechlorinator when
refilling the pond and adding beneficial bacteria to jump-start
the whole system. You can help it along by bringing out some of
the indoor containment water and adding this to the pond.

Once you get the fish outside, remember good feeding practices
and that the bacteria has to catch up to prevent ammonia spikes.

Regards,
Carolyn


========== @SK Carolyn =============
Have a pond question? Just send it in
to: Carolyn@macarthurwatergardens.com
and our own in-house pond expert will
try and answer it for you! Write POND
in the subject line for quick response!
====================================

Happy Pondkeeping!

Brett Fogle
MacArthur Water Gardens
www.macarthurwatergardens.com
MacArthur Water Gardens
PO Box 3628
Alpharetta, GA 30023-3628

-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-

Posted by bfogle at 07:54 PM | Comments (0)

April 21, 2015

String Algae / Sludge-Debris

-------------------------------
Today's Pond Q&A

In this issue:

- Controlling String Algae

- Removing Sludge/Debris

-----------------------------

Question #1>

Dear Carolyn,

I live in the Houston, TX area and have a small pond in my
backyard. Last year I developed a severe string algae problem.
It is in my plants, on my pump, on the sides of the pond, etc -
anything it can cling to.

I might mention that I have not cleaned the pond out in three
years, but did suck out some of the sludge on the bottom. I
know that I will be cleaning the pond this spring.

Do I ditch my plants (anachris)? Other than scraping the algae
off the sides of the pond and off the containers, what else can
I do to not allow it to get a foothold?


==

Answer #1>

Hello,

Aha, the dirty water syndrome. Algae, if left unattended for a
while, will overtake a pond.

In the case of anachris,I don't believe in underwater plants in
a pond. They are dirt catchers and impede the water flow to the
filter. Water plants also take in carbon dioxide during the
sunlight hours and give off oxygen. But at night they do the
opposite- they use up the oxygen and give off carbon dioxide, so
I think they kind of cancel out their own benefits.

There are only three basic requirements for algae growth:
ambient nutrients, warm temperatures and sunlight (as it is a
plant).

In your case, the dirty water and carbon dioxide will provide
ample nutrient base for algae growth. Water changes are a quick
fix at best. You need plants above the water, if you have a
water garden, such as lilies, lotus and iris. If it is a fish
pond, I suggest you increase the filtration and oxygenation to
the pond.

You can check on upgrades at
http://www.macarthurwatergardens.com/biological.shtml
because until the water is cleaned up, there won't be any lasting
improvement in the algae conditions. Scrubbing won't work
unless you plan on doing it every week. Good luck and I hope
this has helped you.

Regards,
Carolyn


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Question #2>

Dear Carolyn,

My fish pond holds about 1800 gallons of water (it's four feet
wide, by about 10 feet long and is about 15 or 16 inches deep.
It's got a water pump (external to the pond) but it's not had a
proper clean out for about 3 years (I just bought the house).

There's a lot of sludge in the bottom which I've been scooping
out with a hand-held fish net, but it's a long process and I
have to keep saving the tiny wee fish that get caught up in it.

Any suggestions would be appreciated (without costing mega bucks
would be even better).


==

Answer #2>

Hi,

I would say the way to cleaning it up would be to increase the
filtration and flow of water through the pond. If the pond is
circulating better, that which has settled to the bottom should
become stirred up where the filter can remove it. You may also
wish to try Microbe-Lift/Sludge Away. It is quite efficient at
removing sludge.

I assume you are looking at sludge and not un-biodegraded
leaves, right? If there is large debris on the bottom I think
you should clean it up manually. The rest can be done by
increasing the water flow in the pond, perhaps by restricting
the circumference of the pipe that returns the water to its
lowest size, and have it resting below the water surface. Fish
will be able to swim away from the filter, but organic and
inorganic debris will be trapped.

MacArthur Water Gardens sells vacuums to clean up bottom debris
as well as the Microbe-Lift bacterial additive products. Also
check out the pumps and filters at
http://www.macarthurwatergardens.com/biological.shtml

Good luck,
Carolyn


========== @SK Carolyn =============
Have a pond question? Just send it in
to: Carolyn@macarthurwatergardens.com
and our own in-house pond expert will
try and answer it for you! Write POND
in the subject line for quick response!
====================================

Happy Pondkeeping!

Brett Fogle
MacArthur Water Gardens
www.macarthurwatergardens.com

MacArthur Water Gardens
PO Box 3628
Alpharetta, GA 30023-3628


Posted by bfogle at 12:41 AM | Comments (0)

April 18, 2015

Water Quality / Fish-Safe Pond Renovation

-------------------------------
Today's Pond Q&A

In this issue:

- Water Quality

- Fish-Safe Pond Renovation

-----------------------------

Question #1>

Dear Carolyn,

We have two ponds. One with gold fish and one with Koi. We have
spent years fighting dirty looking water and fighting to keep
the pond filter clean. Recently a bird attacked our gold fish
pond and we were left with only a few fish. We decided to give
them away and start over with just koi.

It is now winter and we did not want to add any new fish or
plants until the weather warms up. Without the gold fish the
water in the pond is no longer dirty looking and we have not
cleaned the filter in more than 2 months. I suspect the gold
fish were just putting off too much waste. What is your opinion
on this?

Bonita

==

Answer #1>

Hi, Bonita,

I think you have hit on the answer. The more fish, the reduced
water quality. The solution to pollution is dilution. You can
either increase the filtration exponentially or you can reduce
the fish bio-load. This time, Mother Nature did it for you.

However, I wouldn't consider koi easier to keep. They produce
more debris than goldfish. When stocking the pond, whatever you
decide, try to keep that in mind.

In addition, a better filter will add to the water quality.
Check out bio-filters at
http://www.macarthurwatergardens.com/biological.shtml.
I'm sure there is something that will work for your pond.

One more thing, colder water is always clearer. When the water
warms up it may become cloudier again without stronger
filtration.

Regards,
Carolyn


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Question #2>

Dear Carolyn,

We have a 550 gal pond in our church garden in Venice, FL. Last
winter somebody vandalized it by throwing some of the outer,
decorative rocks into the water. I was able to get most of them
out, but resolved to reshape the interior with less shelves and
expand the diameter somewhat.

I've used Florida native rock so far and plan to continue that
for the border, but I want to invisibly join them with epoxy or
something to prevent vandalism. Could you tell me something that
is fish safe?

I'm planning to do this work next month before it gets too hot.
We have 2 eight-inch comets in there, though they must be
"hibernating" - we didn't see them last winter either. What can
I put them in for a couple days?

I will have the old pump if I need to aerate a giant storage bin
for example. Do not plan on koi, this is supposed to be natural
and have many plants. I'm going to remove all the soil and
replant them in baskets of gravel - correct?

One more - what do you think about electrolitic control of algae
with silver/copper rods?

Thanks so much - love your column,
Mary Beth

==

Answer #2>

Hi, Mary Beth,

That "someone" may have been a "something" that wrecked the
rocks in the pond. And if so, it just may have saved the life
of those two fish. Predators are deterred more easily if rocks
are rickety and prefer to have something solid to stand on. But
if you are sure it was vandalism then by all means renovate and
secure the rocks. It is a very good idea to remove the shelves.

Let me say first that I do not install ponds, but have a little
experience with my own. In my own pond I have used concrete to
secure loose stonework along the stream, and the waterproof
expanding (black) foam in the crevices to seal and secure the
corners. Just wash the concrete with muriatic acid and then
rinse with fresh water before putting the fish back in. The
fish should be fine in any container, in a shaded area, with
some aeration (and no feeding while in there.)

As for the algae control, I would not advise this. Copper in
the pond can be deadly to fish. Why not add more plants, feed
less, or add a UV light? MacArthur Water Gardens sells UV
lights that you would be able to use and would be much safer for
the fish.

Thanks for your questions,
Carolyn


========== @SK Carolyn =============
Have a pond question? Just send it in
to: Carolyn@macarthurwatergardens.com
and our own in-house pond expert will
try and answer it for you! Write POND
in the subject line for quick response!
====================================

Happy Pondkeeping!

Brett Fogle
MacArthur Water Gardens
www.macarthurwatergardens.com
MacArthur Water Gardens
PO Box 3628
Alpharetta, GA 30023-3628

-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-

Posted by bfogle at 12:37 AM | Comments (0)

April 14, 2015

Adding Chlorinated Water/How Chlorine Affects Fish

-------------------------------
Today's Pond Q&A

In this issue:

- Adding Chlorinated Water

- How Chlorine Affects Fish

-----------------------------

Question #1> Dear Carolyn,

I have city water. With a 13,000 gallon pond how many gallons of
chlorinated water can be added to the pond to top it off without
hurting my fish?

(I have 25 fish 12" to 22".) My filter system is a man-made
Japanese matting system with 12 -30"x30" mats and between each
set of mats I have 12" disc (3) aerators and 4 large bags of
plastic bio media. I run two large external pumps which draw
from the bottom of the pond. I have a skimmer opposite the
falls and the return from the skimmer is a 2" flex pipe which I
run to the bottom of the pond.

Also, how an I tell the "GOOD" bacteria count? I test weekly
for nitrates, ammonia, and pH. Do you have a test for bacteria?
Does adding sugar increase good bacteria in a pond like it does
in the garden?

Thanks for you help!


==

Answer #1>

That's a lot of good questions!

The sugar is not effective in the pond, so don't waste it on the
bacteria.

Next, when topping off the pond I always use a dechlorinator.
If the water supply decides to use chloramine (and more city
water systems are switching to it because it is more stable than
chlorine alone) you will endanger your fish two ways, with
chlorine and with ammonia. If you are just topping off with 10%
of 13,000 gallons, that would be 1300 gallons of untreated and
potentially harmful treated water going into the pond. Do you
really want to take the chance? MacArthur Water Gardens stocks
chlorine neutralizers. Check out our link at
http://www.macarthurwatergardens.com/Additives/pondcare_chlorine_neutralizer.html.

I would use a dechlorinator and then test for ammonia. Generally,
in 10% water changes you shouldn't need to worry about the ammonia
because the bacteria should be able to handle it. But in larger
water changes, you need to be very careful these days.

We don't have a meter to count bacteria. The results of your
other tests will tell you how the bacteria is doing. If you are
having a reading on your ammonia test, nitrate or nitrite, then
you will know the bacteria levels are inadequate for your
bio-load. I realize it sounds lame, but if you are adding
bacteria on a maintenance program, you will have no problems.

As for pH, the bacteria does not affect pH. Quite the opposite-
pH will affect the bacteria. Bacteria need a pH between 7.0-7.5
to do their best job.


Regards, Carolyn


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Enter Your Pond for our 'Pond of the Month' Contest!
Just send us several good pictures of your backyard
pond paradise, and if you win -- we'll feature you on
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Question #2> Hi Carolyn,

I just talked to the engineer at our South Bend, IN Water Works
and he informed me that chlorine gas was added to the water at
one gallon of chlorine gas to 1 million gallons of water. He
told me he puts the city water in his aquarium and has never had
a problem. Well, now what? Sure doesn't sound like much
chlorine gas but I don't know the min. PPM for fish. EEESH.

Oh, wanted to share one of my microscopic findings. White
vinegar kills flukes! Pretty cool huh? I found that out as I
studied the little buggers last spring. I give my Macaw 1/2
teaspoon of white vinegar in her water every Monday to kill
parasites (as suggested by a breeder) so I thought I'd test it
on my fish. What a great surprise! I caught my fish and
dipped them in a solution of white vinegar and water. When I
scrapped them again...no parasites! I add white vinegar to my
pond now. It will lower the pH so you have to monitor the
effects. (My study resulted in 1 tablespoon of white vinegar
per gallon of water lowered the pH for 7.5 to 6.5) I haven't
had any problems with flukes since. :)

This is a new spring and I have already put vinegar in my
pond...can't wait to see the fish come up for food in the next
month so I can catch one and scrape it for flukes. Keeping my
fingers crossed over here!

I look forward to your continued support through your newsletter
(Approx. 3 years ago the Pond Dr. from Africa told me
MacArthur was the place to do business for serious ponders- )

I look forward to your comments on the chlorine.

==

Answer #2> Hello South Bend,

I agree that it doesn't sound like much, but fish have a zero
tolerance for chlorine. They cannot breath without full gill
capacity.

I don't know about that man's aquarium, or what type of fish he
keeps, or if he ages the water first (which would allow the
chlorine to escape into the air), but I certainly would not add
chlorinated water to my pond.

Damaged gill tissue does not repair over time. Fins and scales
grow back. Gills don't. The other way to remove the chlorine
is to spray it through the air first. Or age it for a few days
to a week...

Regards,
Carolyn


========== @SK Carolyn =============
Have a pond question? Just send it in
to: Carolyn@macarthurwatergardens.com
and our own in-house pond expert will
try and answer it for you! Write POND
in the subject line for quick response!
====================================

Happy Pondkeeping!

Brett Fogle
MacArthur Water Gardens
www.macarthurwatergardens.com
MacArthur Water Gardens
PO Box 3628
Alpharetta, GA 30023-3628

-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-

Posted by bfogle at 04:51 AM | Comments (0)

April 11, 2015

Pond Clarifiers / Green Water

-------------------------------
Today's Pond Q&A

In this issue:

- Pond Clarifiers

- Green Water

-----------------------------

Question #1> Dear Carolyn,


I built a 3,500 gallon pond with a waterfall just short of two
years ago as a retirement present to my wife and myself. We
love the pond, plants, the 5 Koi and 3 gold fish that are
healthy and growing in our Zone 4 environment. Oh yes, the
suspended and string algae are happy and healthy too.

When purchasing the equipment for the pond, the supplier told me
to use river rocks over the liner 1) to make the pond look more
natural and 2) to help the beneficial bacteria colonize. I have
been using Crystal Clear Biological Clarifier with less than
satisfactory results.

I just purchased and have yet to install a Tetra Pond Green
Free UV2 Ultraviolet Light Clarifier to rid the pond of the
suspended algae.

My questions are:

1) Can the Crystal Clear Biological Clarifier (bacteria) and the
UV2 light coexist effectively?

2) Would it be better to use just one of the above?

3) If I use the UV2 light, can I draw the water out from below
the skimmer pad and return the treated water to the top of the
same pad?

4) Should I forget the above and use Pond Care Algaefix?

5) Can the Crystal Clear Bacteria and the Pond Care Algaefix be
used effectively at the same time?

As you can tell, I have more questions than answers. At least I
feel like I am now going up the learning curve.

Thank you so much for your time and assistance!

Hal 'The Happy Pond Man'


==

Answer #1> Okay, Hal

First, I wish you had a bottom drain, but you don't. That would
eliminate most of the detritus from the pond as it settles to
the bottom rather than going into a skimmer.

Next, for bacteria, you would need to shut the UV sterilizer for
the first 2 -3 days after adding the bacteria in order for it to
become established. A UV will kill any bacteria that goes
through it, which was the primary purpose for UV's, to kill
bacteria not algae. The fact it kills single-celled algae is a
bonus.

As for using AlgaeFix, it will work nicely and you can follow it
after 3 days with the bacteria because the now dead algae will
need to be biodegraded to prevent a new algae bloom. Anytime
you use an algaecide be sure to add more aeration to the pond.

For your third question, I think you should use the cleanest
water available to put through the UV which is why we generally
attach one after the filter. I'm not sure why you want to empty
the cleaned water back through the skimmer pad. Doesn't make
sense to me.

Maybe you would like to try a different bacterial product after
using the algaecide, like Microbe-Lift/PL? It will balance the
system for you. Like any other living product, you need to
allow it time to work, but it might work better for you than the
Crystal Clear because it is a live bacteria and Crystal Clear is
spore-based.

Oh, and don't overfeed those fish or you'll never get rid of the
algae...

Regards, Carolyn


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Enter Your Pond for our 'Pond of the Month' Contest!
Just send us several good pictures of your backyard
pond paradise, and if you win -- we'll feature you on
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Question #2> Hi Carolyn,

I have green water in my pond. I live in England and there
is no sun this time of year but I do have 8 frogs. I changed the
water 2 weeks ago and it was crystal clear. The temp is 2
degrees.

==

Answer #2> Hi,

With that little information it is very difficult for me to guess
what the problem would be. However, if it is spring in England,
as it is here, then green water shouldn't be that unusual. This
is the time when pond life is resuming. I am not sure about the
temperature you quoted and whether pond bacteria is able to
perform. It has been a mild winter in the USA and most ponds
are inundated with algae in one form or another. Whether you
are experiencing sun or clouds, there is sunlight up there
somewhere and must be projecting onto the pond.

The three basic requirements for algae to grow are ambient
nutrients, sunlight and water temperature. As water begins to
warm, and days are getting longer, all you would need is fish or
frogs (or birds for that matter) to poop in the pond. That
would provide the nutrients. Hope this helps explain the green
water.

As for ridding the pond of green water, water changes are only a
quick fix at best. The pond bacteria need to become activated
in order to clear up the pond in most cases. If you would like
to look at a better filtration, please go to
http://www.macarthurwatergardens.com/biological.shtml and look
at what is available for your size pond. Filtration and
oxygenation are key to good bacteria and clean water in a pond.

Regards,
Carolyn


========== @SK Carolyn =============
Have a pond question? Just send it in
to: Carolyn@macarthurwatergardens.com
and our own in-house pond expert will
try and answer it for you! Write POND
in the subject line for quick response!
====================================

Happy Pondkeeping!

Brett Fogle
MacArthur Water Gardens
www.macarthurwatergardens.com
MacArthur Water Gardens
PO Box 3628
Alpharetta, GA 30023-3628

-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-

Posted by bfogle at 07:02 PM | Comments (0)

April 08, 2015

Controlling Algae / Aerators & Stocking Fish

-------------------------------
Today's Pond Q&A

In this issue:

- Controlling Algae

- Aerators/Stocking Fish

-----------------------------

Question #1>

Dear Carolyn,

I have heard that you can use horticulture corn meal to control
algae in ponds. Have you ever tried this?

I currently have an 8,000 gallon pond and fight hair algae until
my plants get started, then it seems to go away. I do not like
to use chemicals in my pond If I don't have to. Can you suggest
any better way?

==

Answer #1>

I feel as you do. I do not throw chemicals into my pond, even
salt, unless I know for sure what I am treating and there is no
other way. But I have an affinity for natural products and
bacterial additives to help stabilize the pond.

For my own pond, I use the Microbe-Lift Barley Straw concentrate
because it makes a big difference in water clarity. The
horticulture corn meal probably works on the same premise by
sequestering excess nutrients that would feed the algae. But I
have never heard of using it before in ponds.

A UV light is really the best way to control green-water algae,
although string algae will not be affected.

Regards,
Carolyn


_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/ _/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/ _/_/_/_/_/_/
Enter Your Pond for our 'Pond of the Month' Contest!
Just send us several good pictures of your backyard
pond paradise, and if you win -- we'll feature you on
our website! Send your pictures and a brief description
to us at Carolyn@macarthurwatergardens.com
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Question #2>

Dear Carolyn,

I am currently building 3 concrete ponds measuring 2x5x1 metres
side by side and I intend to stock it with 2,000 fingerlings
each as I was told that 200 fishes can be stocked per square
metre.

What type of aerator do I use to get the best result. Is
stocking 2,000 fishes to grow out ideal? What are the pros and
cons? Please offer the necessary advice.


==

Answer #2>

I am not into construction, but I will share what knowledge I
have with you. A couple of things on concrete ponds:

First, after construction is completed, with rebar reinforcement
and preferably a liner in there somewhere to prevent future
leakage, be sure to wash the concrete with muriatic acid, then
flush well a few times with fresh water.

After that is done, you can use Dechlorinator to neutralize any
chemicals in the new water. I would recommend using good
aeration and filtration for the fish you intend to grow out.

For good water movement you may wish to install PVC pipes along
the bottom of the ponds from the filter to bring clean water
into the pond through the bottom.

I would also use the aerator at the beginning of this pipe, to
aerate and circulate at the same time.

MacArthur Water Gardens has excellent pumps and Aquabead filters
to handle the fish load.

You didn't say what type of fish you are growing, but suppose
koi would outgrow these confines in one year. I hope you are
good at culling.

Regards,
Carolyn


========== @SK Carolyn =============
Have a pond question? Just send it in
to: Carolyn@macarthurwatergardens.com
and our own in-house pond expert will
try and answer it for you! Write POND
in the subject line for quick response!
====================================

Happy Pondkeeping!

Brett Fogle
MacArthur Water Gardens
www.macarthurwatergardens.com
MacArthur Water Gardens
PO Box 3628
Alpharetta, GA 30023-3628

-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-

Posted by bfogle at 05:37 AM | Comments (0)

Bacterial Eye Infection / Algae Problems

-------------------------------
Today's Pond Q&A

In this issue:

-Bacterial Eye Infection

-Algae Problems

-----------------------------

Question #1>

Dear Carolyn,

I have wintered 3 goldfish (2.5") in a tank, they have been doing
well until I noticed one was not eating. On closer examination
I noticed it seemed to be blind as it only takes food if it
bumps into it, its eyes seem a bit swollen as though covered by
a lower lid.

Is there anything you can suggest that I can do, they are due to
go out into the pond soon. ( they have filter, airiation & 1/3
water change each week)

While on the subject of ponds, I put some pond sticks and flake
out for a spring feed, later I noticed a thin layer of oil
across the surface. Am I right in thinking that such a layer of
oil stops oxygen reaching the water?.

Trusting you can help,

Regards.
Jack

==

Answer #1>

Jack,

That fish may have a bacterial eye infection. It may kill the
fish. I'm not a veterinarian, but I don't think it will improve
without the right treatment. I'm sorry but I don't have an
answer on treating the fish. You should have it looked at
before you put it out in the pond. The eyes could have been
damaged when the fish was netted or even at birth and you never
noticed before, so I wouldn't dump medications into the pond
until I checked further (preferably with a vet).

As for the oil slick, my pond also has a slight oil slick this
time of year. If the water were to be covered by oil, there
would be no oxygen-gas exchange. But a slight oil slick on top
of the water shouldn't be terminal for the pond inhabitants. At
shows, we would use paper towels to mop it up, but if you put
the waterfall and skimmer on, it should dissipate.

Regards,
Carolyn


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Question #2>

Dear Carolyn,

My question is this: I have a 55 gallon molded pond, one
purchased from a home center. I also live in the desert
southwest so the sun in very intense. Last summer, I had a
severe algae problem. I used various commercial products to try
to control the algae. None seemed to work that well. I believe
the amount of sun we receive is the main culprit.

We now have a new dog who insists on drinking from this pond.
How can I keep the algae at a minimum and keep my dog safe?
Any ideas would be helpful.

Thanks,
Kathy

==

Answer #2>

Hi, Kathy,

I don't mean to laugh, but the pond sounds like a perfect dog
water bowl. The only requirements for algae growth are: ambient
nutrients, temperature and sun. Sounds like you have abundant 2
out of 3. If you have any fish in the pond, you have all 3.

Instead of adding chemicals to the pond, I suggest you try
removing some of the algae's necessities. Try shading the pond,
either with plants or some other type of structure. This will
also lower the temperatures somewhat.

Next, if you have any fish in there, I would cut way back on
feeding. Especially in heat, fish don't need much food anyway.

Then, if you are able to add some type of plants, or increase
the amount of plants (taller plants are better) they will remove
nutrients from the water.

The last thing is circulation and filtration. I don't know what
you are using, but more is better in this department. Moving
water won't stagnate and filtered water also reduces algal
growth. After all, as a dog lover myself, we want the cleanest
water for the dog, don't we??

Regards,
Carolyn


========== @SK Carolyn =============
Have a pond question? Just send it in
to: Carolyn@macarthurwatergardens.com
and our own in-house pond expert will
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====================================

Happy Pondkeeping!

Brett Fogle
MacArthur Water Gardens
www.macarthurwatergardens.com

MacArthur Water Gardens
PO Box 3628
Alpharetta, GA 30023-3628

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Posted by bfogle at 05:35 AM | Comments (0)