August 31, 2005

Today's Pond Q&A

Funniest Pond Stories - Part II

Hi Folks,

Brett Fogle here, and have I had a blast reading your stories!

We've narrowed down the entries to the top four funniest
stories and now it's your turn to vote.

Just visit

http://www.macarthurwatergardens.com/FunnyPondStories2005.html

to register your vote.

Be sure to vote quickly! We're hoping to announce the winner
in this weekend's issue of PondStuff!

So hurry on over to

http://www.macarthurwatergardens.com/FunnyPondStories2005.html

and exercise your funny bone!

Happy Pondkeeping!

MacArthur Water Gardens
www.macarthurwatergardens.com

© MacArthur Water Gardens
PO Box 3628
Alpharetta, GA 30023-3628

Posted by bfogle at 02:12 AM | Comments (0)

August 30, 2005

Today's Pond Q&A

-------------------------------
Today's Pond Q&A

In this issue:

- SLUDGE - DIRT ON THE BOTTOM OF THE POND

- ALGAE PROBLEM - FIGHT OR FLIGHT?
-----------------------------

Question>

I have a pond that has collected a lot of settled dirt on the
bottom, however the water is crystal clear. Is there a way to
clean up the bottom dirt?

Kathy Bryan

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Answer>

Hi, Kathy,

Yes, there is a Microbe Lift product that is specifically made to
remove the debris on the bottom, called Microbe Lift Sludge Away.
It will turn the pond dark brown initially and then clear up
again on its own, so don't worry. It may take a few applications
to clean it but that is the sole purpose of that product. The
beauty of it is that it is biodegradable so it will not harm you,
plants or fish.

- Carolyn

==

Question>

Hi Carolyn!

This is my third year of having a fish and aquatic
pond. The biofilter prevents the water from being green but I
have to clean the filters twice a week from algae clumps, etc. I
tried using Microbelift PL but it didn't seem to help keep the
sludge controlled and I even bought a water wych and the water is
not mountain stream clear.

Is it ok to combine algae fix and pond zyme to assist in keeping
the water clear enough to enjoy my fish or should I just use one
or the other? My pond is 220 gallons and I use a 300 gph pump
feeding into the biofilter. I also have a polyurethane water
fall with a 500 gph pump feeding into it. It seems to me that
this water fall may be the culprit in producing additional algae
and sludge. What do you think?

Thanks- Barb Luick

==

Answer>

Hi Barb,

Before I use an algaecide I would use the barley straw extract or
pellets which are recommended to be used in conjunction with the
Microbe Lift PL. The barley straw produces "lignin", a naturally
occurring chemical that will inhibit the growth of algae while
the PL actually competes with algae for the nutrients it needs to
subsist in the pond. They are a "team" and best used together on
algae problems.

You also mentioned sludge. I don't know if you are speaking of a
sludge build-up on the bottom (in which case you should read the
message above) or are referring to the algae clumps. But I have
to mention a few things about algae here. First, there are
several main types of algae and although it is natural in a pond,
it is not harmful to fish. The single-celled free floating algae
is the one that causes the green water condition we call "pea
soup". The string algae can be easily removed, although
temporarily, (as it grows back readily) by using a stick and
wrapping it around like spaghetti on a fork. And the worst algae
is blanket-weed which is capable of actually choking out other
life forms in the pond.

Although you don't really describe blanket weed, if you feel it
exists in your pond you may still want to use the algaecide, but
should use it first, then wait three to four days before adding
the Microbe Lift PL and barley straw products. The algaecide
will kill the algae and interfere with the bacteria in the
Microbe Lift otherwise.

As for the waterfall, I don't see how it can be causing problems.
The more water flow, the less settlement as I see it. More than
likely it is the hot, hot weather and sun causing it. In a 200
gallon pond, I expect the water would heat up quickly during the
day. And if you feed the fish a few more pellets than they
really need, you have all the makings of algae bloom. The extra
water circulation is probably helping you keep the water clear.

- Carolyn

==

Happy Pondkeeping!

MacArthur Water Gardens
www.macarthurwatergardens.com

© MacArthur Water Gardens
PO Box 3628
Alpharetta, GA 30023-3628

Posted by bfogle at 12:09 PM | Comments (0)

August 27, 2005

Today's Pond Q&A

-------------------------------
Today's Pond Q&A

In this issue:

- AMMONIA - POPULATION EXPLOSION & HOW DO I CLEAN THE FILTER?

- SAND FILTERS
-----------------------------

Question>

Help! This is going to sound like a stupid question, but I've
never seen the answer anywhere !

We've had quite a problem getting our ammonia under control this
year for our tiny 100-gallon pond. We started three years ago
with three goldfish and three shubunkin, and they enjoyed life
so well that they had families. Huge families.

We've given away 27 of the little guys this year and still have
about 25 (four large ones and the rest about two inches but
growing! (Insert sigh here). We are contemplating another
fish-giving event. At any rate, I do frequent water changes,
add ammonia-removing chemicals and service the bio-filter.

That's my question--when I service the bio-filter, I know I
don't disturb the bacteria-growing media and I only use a bucket
of pond water to clean the filter. But do I clean only the two
layers of mesh-type material in the water? Or do I leave
everything alone? Or do I clean out all the goop within the
entire filter box?

In other words, how do I clean the bio-filter? Any suggestions
on getting our ammonia under control would also be welcomed.

Thanks for your wonderful Q & A--I read each one with
pleasure!

Beverly Herald

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Answer>

Hi Beverly,

I would suggest you clean ALL the goop out of the filter, but
use clean "aged" (or clean pond) water to rinse it rather than
using any chlorinated water from the tap.

I suggest you also cut down on feeding if you haven't already
done so. Ammo Lock and Amquel will help in a pinch, and the
water changes are very beneficial. Either use dechlor (or aged
water) before you refill the pond.

Do you think your local church or girl scouts group would like to
have a benefit "raffle" of your extra goldfish? Unless you
consider doubling the filtration on that 100-gal. pond, you have
way too many fish in there.

- Carolyn

==

Question>

Hi Carolyn,

I have a question for you. I have a 900 gallon pond that is 3
years old. when I first set up the pond I put a Fish Mate box
filter, with a 1800 gal per pump and a 25 watt UV sterilizer
light. The pond is sun almost all day and the water was never
clear in fact it would get full of algae all the time. I had
about 40 % plants with goldfish and 4 koi. I looked at several
different kinds of filters and the one I wanted were out of my
price range.

Someone told me to get a Pool sand filter. I could afford one of
those. I got it last year around august and once i put it in
there the water was crystal clear. It ran all year and I changed
the sand in march and then again in June.

Now I saw an email at this site not sure if it was written by
Brett, but it said that sand filters are not good and that they
can be harmful for the fish. So my question to you is why is
harmful and if it's because of the sand could you replace the
sand with another bio media?

I would greatly appreciate an answer as I cannot afford the high
priced filters for the pond.

Thanks, Mary

==

Answer>

Hi Mary,

Good question. The reason sand filters are not recommended is the
bacteria will colonize rather quickly in the sand and before you
realize the system will become toxic. Clear water isn't
necessarily healthy water. Those filters are meant to be used
with chlorine and other chemicals, as in pools. The media (sand)
doesn't allow enough oxygen and can quickly become anaerobic,
which is toxic to fish.

I checked with Brett and was told that many have tried to replace
the media but it has not worked. There isn't enough room for
other media in there to do the job. If you continue to replace
the sand religiously, perhaps you can make do.

It is the absence of oxygen in there that causes the problems.
Did you ever see a fishtank with undisturbed fine gravel on the
bottom and notice the darkening layer underneath, darker as you
go deeper? And when cleaning the sand/gravel, if you did this, do
you remember what it smelled like? That smell is the presence of
anaerobic bacteria making hydrogen sulfide. Deadly to fish. And
as it is formed, it comes up in bubbles from the sand, into the
water, and into the pond.

Hope this helps.

- Carolyn

==

Happy Pondkeeping!

MacArthur Water Gardens
www.macarthurwatergardens.com

© MacArthur Water Gardens
PO Box 3628
Alpharetta, GA 30023-3628

Posted by bfogle at 12:08 PM | Comments (0)

August 25, 2005

Today's Pond Q&A

-------------------------------
Today's Pond Q&A

In this issue:

- LILIES FOR LUNCH

- ULCERS
-----------------------------

Question>

Dear Carolyn,

We have a very curious situation going on in our pond recently.
We have an 11 X 16 foot, 1900 gallon pond in our back yard. There
are 2 planted lily's and 3 potted lily's all are hardy. They were
all doing well and flowering regularly.

However today we noticed several leaves on 3 plants are missing.
One looks half chewed away, the rest (about 6) are just chewed
right to the stem.

This is our second year with the pond and our Koi which survived
the New England winter are thriving and have had babies twice
since last summer. Do you have any idea what may be lunching on
our lilies?

Help!

Sincerely, Marty

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Answer>

Well, Marty, it sounds like your koi may be having company you
aren’t aware of. You might want to look for a turtle in there
somewhere. When koi spawn they can destroy lilies and any other
plants that are in a pond but what you are describing really
sounds like more than that. I suspect either turtles or even a
visiting raccoon may be coming in at night. The raccoons don’t
actually eat the leaves, but they will break and tear them trying
to get the fish.

See if any of the missing leaves are on the bottom of the pond
somewhere. Otherwise, you can look for the turtle.

A word to the wise? Turtles also eat fish and carry a bacterium
that is not healthy in a koi pond.

- Carolyn

==

Question>

I don’t have a question for you. I actually have some good news
to share.

Last year was the first year we had our pond. We built in July.
It is approximately 2400 gallons with a nice waterfall and
stream. We lost a total of 3 koi last year to ulcers that we just
couldn’t get under control. It started with 2 new koi we
purchased which we did not quarantine as we should have. Small
marks on one’s side and on the top of the other one soon became
ulcers. We tried everything from medicated food to salt to
Melafix to Potassium Permanganate.

I had read on a vet website somewhere about injections and that
was just beyond my ability as a 1st year koi keeper. I then came
across an article about using clove oil to put the fish to sleep
and simply treating the wound directly with iodine, then waking
it up in fresh water and returning it to the pond. One of our
favorite fish was the only one with an ulcer and still alive. I
decided to try it. It worked. It took 4 treatments and she was
completely healed. She does have a scar, but that I can live
with.

This year we had one fish that we believe was scraped along her
back during spawning by a rock. It was beginning to turn into an
ulcer. We pulled her out, treated her twice with the iodine (once
a week for 2 weeks) and the wound has completely healed. I see
questions all of the time about ulcers and I hoped maybe it could
be helpful. By doing it as soon as we noticed something not
right on her, we were able to prevent it from growing as it did
last year. The time it takes for all of those other solutions
(except injections) allowed the ulcers to become so horrendous.

I wanted to share this option since it really was so simple and
worked so well. I know that you must be careful not to put them
too to sleep but I used 5 drops of clove oil to each gallon of
water- mixed first in a small amount of water to emulsify. I
placed the fish in the water and within 5-10 minutes they begin
to fall asleep.

They are very easy to hold at this point. Using gloves I removed
the fish and quickly treated the wound directly with iodine. We
then placed the fish in a container of fresh water to recover for
15 minutes. We covered the buckets each time with a light net
just to be sure they don’t jump out.

Thanks for reading my long story… I just hope it can help someone
save a fish in a way that they may be much more comfortable with
then injections.

Melissa Rekos

==

Answer>

Thanks Melissa for the helpful information! I generally tell
people to put 2-3 drops of Oil of Cloves into one gallon of water
to anesthetize fish however, and make sure they never walk away
while the fish are in the solution because the fish can keep
sleeping —and die. This is the same solution we use to euthanize
fish when necessary, very humanely. But your directions are
wonderful and will be very helpful to others.

Also consider using LynnoZyme of KoiZyme to eliminate Aeromonas
(the guilty bacteria that causes ulcer disease in koi) from the
pond as a maintenance regimen.

It only takes one parasite bite or a knocked off scale to open a
fish to infection.

- Carolyn

==

Happy Pondkeeping!

MacArthur Water Gardens
www.macarthurwatergardens.com

© MacArthur Water Gardens
PO Box 3628
Alpharetta, GA 30023-3628

Posted by bfogle at 12:06 PM | Comments (0)

August 23, 2005

Today's Pond Q&A

-------------------------------
Today's Pond Q&A

In this issue:

- SAND FILTERS - FOR LARGER PONDS?

- WELL WATER - HOW CAN IT BE USED FOR PONDS?
-----------------------------

Question>

Carolyn,

I think I understood from your response to the sand filter
question that they were not good for ponds. Why is it that they
are suggested as part of the filtration in larger natural ponds
like the aqua scape systems?

We’re about to crank up a 200,000 gal pond with gravel over
slotted pipe in the bottom and several glass bead filters and UV
sterilizers to polish things up… what’s the scoop?

Thanks, Kerry

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Answer>

Yes, Kerry, I said sand filters are not recommended for koi
ponds. Sand filters were developed for use with chemicals, such
as swimming pools with chlorine, and have limited oxygen flow
which creates an ideal environment for anaerobic bacteria. These
filters are excellent for filtering out minute particulate
matter, but not for bio-filtration.

In koi ponds we recommend the bio-filtration for the health of
the fish as well as the cleanliness of the water. The water could
be very clean (clear) and yet contain lethal doses of ammonia,
nitrates or nitrites, none of which are visible but are silent
killers.

This is the primary difference between pools and ponds with fish.

What you are describing in your large pond (lake?) sounds perfect
because under the rocks you have the oxygen/water flow through
the pipe. The large pebbles, versus sand, will permit the almost
unobstructed flow to both clean and aerate the bottom of the
pond.

- Carolyn

==

Question>

Carolyn I have a good water supply but has iron which most wells
around here has, so can i filter it some how to remove the iron
and stuff and use in my pond?

Farrell Sutton

==

Answer>

Hi Farrell,

I wonder what else is in your well water and is it safe to drink?

As for the iron removal, yes, you should be able to get a filter
to remove the excess minerals in the water in order to use in the
pond and might want to check with the local plumbing supply
company.

However, if the water is not deemed safe to drink, I would not
use it in the pond either. Fish are susceptible to high levels
of bacteria or other contaminants that exist in many ground water
supplies. In many areas the well water has been banned other
than to water gardens or crops. Please check first.

- Carolyn

==

Happy Pondkeeping!

MacArthur Water Gardens
www.macarthurwatergardens.com

© MacArthur Water Gardens
PO Box 3628
Alpharetta, GA 30023-3628

Posted by bfogle at 12:05 PM | Comments (0)

August 20, 2005

Today's Pond Q&A

-------------------------------
Today's Pond Q&A

In this issue:

- GREEN WATER

- UV STERILIZER
-----------------------------

Question>

Hi Carolyn,

I have a little problem, you guess, with green water. I was build
new 10000 l (2650 gal) pond this spring, make a 600 l filter with
4 chamber, each 150 l. I was fill the water, put the water lily
in it and leave it all 7 days with filter and UV turn on. Water
was crystal clear. Then I was put my 8 small Koi (12-15 cm) in
the pond. Two months water was clear and I was happy because I
was get all that with pump of 2000 l/h and UV 9W.

Now I have problem with my water lily last two year ( the leafs
are very small and every leafs which going out is smaller and
smaller), I was decide to fertilize it with JBL Ferrotabs. And
that is it, another day water was started with green coloration.
After few day water was all green, but also after 30 days lily’s
wasn’t have any progress, so what now?

I know that I must put bigger pump in my pond, about 6000 l/h and
UV about 25W, but is it possible that is all go wrong because
fertilising?

I must say that my koi are in good shape eat well, swimming well,
looks like they are much happier now when water is green?…

Marijan Mrljak
Croatia/ Europe

P.S: I’m sorry on my English grammar but I hope that you’ll
understand

========== @SK Carolyn =============
Have a pond question? Just send it
in to: Carolyn@macarthurwatergardens.com
and our own in-house pond expert will
try and answer it for you!
====================================

Answer>

Well, Marijan, I must say your English is very good! I understand
you very well. And I do believe the fertilizer is the culprit!
Probably water changes will help relieve the situation with the
green water by removing some of the dissolved fertilizer, but the
poor lily apparently did not benefit from the good food you gave.

Do you have access to Pondtabbs Aquatic Plant Food? These are
large tablets of plant food that are ideal for use in potted
lilies in ponds. It is important to push them deep into the pot
away from the root stock so they don't dissolve into the water
and so you do not injure the roots.

The koi might be doing something to prevent good growth on the
lily. They are notorious for ruining plants in the pond. As for
the fish and green water, they love it and it doesn't harm them.
Maybe you would take the lily out of the pond and try to feed and
care for it in another tub until it gets larger leaves.

- Carolyn

==

Question>

Carolyn: I have a 3000 gal koi pond. I maintain water clarity
via a waterfall bio system and skimmer. My question is by
utilizing the bio method, can I also supplement it with a UV
sterilize?

Thanks,

Mike

==

Answer>

Hi Mike,

I don't see why not. A UV light is an important item for a pond
and bio-filtration does not take its place. It, as the name
implies, is a sterilization unit, and the primary purpose is to
dispose of harmful bacteria.

- Carolyn

==

Happy Pondkeeping!

Posted by bfogle at 12:03 PM | Comments (0)

August 18, 2005

Today's Pond Q&A

Funniest Pond Stories - Part II

Hi Folks,

Brett Fogle here, and I want to know your story!

Last year we ran a contest to see who could send in the funniest
pond story to share with our readers, and it was such a big
hit... We're going to do it again!

To read last year's article, click the link below.
http://www.macarthurwatergardens.com/Newsletters/funniest-pond-stories.shtml

So this year we're looking for some even funnier stories, which
will be published in an upcoming issue of PondStuff! our
(sometimes) monthly pond and water gardening newsletter.

The winner of this year's 'Funniest Pond Story' as judged by our
9,000+ readers will win a $50 gift certificate to use when
ordering on our website!

$50 goes a long way towards fish food, a replacement UV bulb,
some Algae Fix -- or whatever you need for your pond... So go
ahead and send in your funniest pond story to me directly at
brett@macarthurwatergardens.com.

If you have pictures, great! Send those also. Please also put the
words 'Funniest Pond Story' in the subject line. (Please send
these to us by this Sunday, August 21st!)

For everybody else, look for these to be published in this
month's issue of PondStuff!

Happy Pondkeeping

Brett Fogle
MacArthur Water Gardens
800-695-4913

-------------------------------
Today's Pond Q&A

In this issue:

- OVERWINTERING (FROG)

- FILTER CLEANING
-----------------------------

Question>

Carolyn,

I live in Massachusetts (zone 5) and I will be winter over my
fish (goldfish & koi) and hardy lilies, marginals this year for
the first time. I plan to have a Thermo Pond heater in the pond.

I recently found I have frog living in the pond, will he survive
since I plan to clean the bottom of the pond he will have no
place to "bury" himself?

Can you recommend any articles/web sites about prepping for
winter.

Thanks!

Bill Ross

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Answer>

Hi Bill,

The Thermo Pond heater is good for winter and I have heard of
frogs overwintering in protected ponds before, but no, he
wouldn't have anyplace in ANY pond with a liner to dig in for
winter. In fact, I hope there aren't any ponds with that much
debris on the bottom. That would be a case of mistaken
priorities because in order for the frog to make it, perhaps the
fish wouldn't.

Frogs don't necessarily stay in the water in winter. They tend
to find soft ground near or under the pond. Many will travel to
find suitable winter digs. If they were born in the pond, they
sometimes come back.

As for preparing for winter, you are already half-way there with
the heater. Clean the pond and stop feeding before the water
temperature hits 50F. As the temperatures hit 60F, cut out the
high protein foods and drop it down to one feeding daily. Then
when it is 55F, feed every other day. If you have any way to
block the wind and weather for winter, that would be a plus.

In case of power outage, keep an opening in the ice by using hot
water instead of trying to forcefully break the ice. Otherwise,
cut off any waterfall or above-ground water supply to the pond.
I would keep the filter circulating. Moving water doesn't freeze
as easily.

And don't forget, we do water changes during the winter also,
whenever weather permits. Literature can be obtained from many
of the pond supply dealers and koi clubs.

- Carolyn

==

Question>

Hi Carolyn,

In the waterfall I have 3 sheet of filter material weight down
by 2 backs of Bio Balls. In the skimmer I have a submergeball
pump connected to the same 2" pipe as the Dragon pump so the one
pump pushes the water toward the Dragon pump and the Dragon pump
pulls the water the reason I did these is because the distance
from the skimmer to the pump is about 20'.

The Dragon pump pumps the water through the aqua beads filter
back to the waterfall. I find that in 2 weeks time the filter
mats in the waterfall are very dirty and I thought that all the
mess would stay in the aquabead filter, witch is cleaned every
week and it looks like it does not have a lot of poop in it.

I have about 30 12" koi in the pond and feed them about 3 times
daily their is never any food left they eat it all. The water in
the pond is very clean that is no problem just that I bought the
aquabead filter so I didn't have to clean the waterfall every
time.

I don't have a prefilter vortex settling chamber only a leaf
trap on the pump. I do have an airblower on the aquabead filter
and I run it for about 3 minutes before I backwash. After
cleaning the filter etc. the water runs good over the waterfall
but in about a week it get less and less than I have to clean
again.

Hope this information will help solve the problem.

Thank you,

Bim

==

Answer>

Okay,Bim, I think I see the problem.

You are filtering the pond to perfection! However, the food is
going in one end (of the fish) and out the other. The mats are
excellent in picking up any debris and so is the filter.

When you think about all that filtration, you may want to think
about what you are filtering exactly-- fish poop. So, the more
you feed, the more you will collect. The mats have to be
"backwashed" by hand versus the filter which is easier.

Would you say your pond is overstocked? These are the things that
contribute to a drain on the filter system, not to say that an
outdoor pond won't collect debris naturally that can in itself
fill up those mats in a week's time. But if you cut back on the
amount of food, maybe in half, you should start to notice a
difference. When koi eat, not having a stomach to digest food,
it is literally pushed in one end and out the other. Sometimes
less really is more, as in this case.

Another thing, you will probably be able to get away with one
filter mat after the pond ecosystem is established. Do you use
Microbe Lift to help break down debris?

- Carolyn

==

Happy Pondkeeping!

MacArthur Water Gardens
www.macarthurwatergardens.com

© MacArthur Water Gardens
PO Box 3628
Alpharetta, GA 30023-3628

Posted by bfogle at 12:02 PM | Comments (0)

August 16, 2005

Today's Pond Q&A

-------------------------------
Today's Pond Q&A

In this issue:

- BACTERIAL INFECTION

- ALGAE PROBLEM
-----------------------------

Question>

Carolyn, I to was unable to identify the cause of fish deaths! My
pond has been in for almost three years. It is about
2,500-gallons, 40 inches deep in the center and oval shaped. I
have a 3500-gallon an hour pump that splits my water through two
separate devices.

The first is a pressurized bio-filter rated for 2500 gallons an
hour that flows to a rock waterfall and the other is a UV filter
that flows into another bio-filter waterfall. The water clarity
is great and all appears to be doing great accept for the rising
death toll. I had about 15-20 koi, mostly babies, 3 medium size
fish 10-12 inches, 3 med under 6-8 inches and the rest are under
5 inches.

Based on all water tests and routine visual exams I to assumed
all was well in my pond. However, about early June I had a
medium-size fish pass away. I checked for any signs of infection
and found none -so I to assumed it was just his time to go. Then
less than a week later I had one more die. This had me worried,
so I checked all my pond chemical levels and they were fine.
Unable to identify any problems I preceded to do a 75% water
change -added in some more salt to get the salt level back up,
got a second opinion from a local pond store owner who did
scrapings on healthy fish, autopsies on dead fish and found
nothing. I went with her thought on treating as a precaution
until we could find the cause. I purchased an air pump that
releases oxygen in the bottom of the pond to ensure that they
were not suffocating and used a broad spectrum product for the
treatment of parasites, protozoa, fungi and bacteria.

Things were good for almost another week then a few days later I
found two more mid-size fish floating.

So we the pond store owner (I buy all fish through her and
happened to have added 2 new small ones this year) and I bagged 2
fish from her store and 2 from my pond to take to Michigan State
University for further testing. Sure enough hers were given a
clean bill of health and mine had an unknown bacteria that
responded to only one antibiotic that had to be injected in each
fish in my pond for three days. I have no more dead fish. It
seems to have worked. I now know what an unknown bacteria is. I
know that MSU will work to classify it. My question is: where do
people like me go to keep up on what is going on with situations
like this? How are these things tracked? I was told that my
infection could have come from anywhere including bird droppings
to frogs jumping in the pond to something that could have been
growing in the food to you name it. The possibilities are
endless.

Thanks Pat

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Answer>

Hi Pat

Yes, that certainly can be a frustrating situation not knowing
how to protect your fish.

The best thing I can recommend, other than what you are already
doing by contacting others (such as today) would be to join a koi
club in your area, use the Internet, and read the literature
available. Most hobbyists are most eager to spread their
knowledge with others.

Dr. Erik Johnson, DVM, has written a number of books on Koi and
fish Health and has a website. There are a plethora of good books
on the subject.

The one thing I would say to you is that no matter what we do,
unforeseen things will happen. Back in 1998, at a Koi show on
Long Island, NY, there was a terrible outbreak of KHV, previously
not known, and most ponds were wiped out before anyone knew what
had happened.

I must commend you and the pond store owner on your affirmative
action. Just know that we will deal with them together to
minimize our losses.

- Carolyn

==

Question>

Pond 8x10x24. Pre-filer, 650 gal per pump, filter with built in
UV, followed by charcoal filter water fall to pond. Water temp up
to 85 degrees.

Every afternoon coating of Algae forms on surface to pond. Using
Eco-Blast but limited result. Algae seem to be suspended in water
all day making it murky.

Have tried emptying half of water, replacing it, but with limited
result. Going nuts, Help. Need for clear water making me ill. Any
ideas?

Dudley

==

Answer>

Hi, Dudley,

Generally the algae is increased by nutrients and high
temperatures in the water this time of year.

I would suggest you change the bulb in the UV, or increase the
size of the UV light. Algae Fixx has been working for us in
ridding the pond of algae that doesn't go through the UV.

If you cut down on feeding, shade the pond (in whatever way is
possible, or at least shade the filters) and address the UV, you
should see some results in a few days. Rather than add more
water, try adding oxygen in addition to the other things
previously mentioned.

- Carolyn

==

Happy Pondkeeping!

Posted by bfogle at 12:00 PM | Comments (0)

August 13, 2005

Today's Pond Q&A

-------------------------------
Today's Pond Q&A

In this issue:

- FILTRATION PROBLEMS
-----------------------------

Question>

I have a 5000 gallon pond and a UV filter plus a Aquabead 2.5
filter and a Wave Dragon 1/4 hp pump the pump is about 20 feet
from the skimmer, but the waterfall was not dropping a lot of
water so I connected the skimmer pump also to the 2" pipe and I
have more water going over the waterfall.

My question is the filters in the waterfall are getting very
dirty and I have to clean them every week and there is a lot of
poop or dirt in there I thought that the Aquabead filter would
clean all that out.

I do clean the Aquabead every week and it doesn't look to dirty
to me so I don't know if the dirt goes right pass the filter.

The pump sucks the water from the skimmer and pumps it through
the Aquabead filter back to the waterfall and the pond. What do
you think is wrong?

Thanks Bim

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Answer>

Bim,

What type filters do you have in your waterfall? The way I am
reading this it sounds like you have one pump, the Dragon, for
both the skimmer and the waterfall? Perhaps you need a second
pump for the waterfall. Where does the Dragon draw the water
from? Is there a bottom drain? Do you have a prefilter vortex
settling chamber before the Aquabead filter?

Generally the Aquabead will remove all the solids, smaller
particles, but you would like to have the larger particles out
of the water before it gets to the pump. If there is no settling
chamber, you will have more debris collecting in the Aquabead.

My guess is that there is too much of a load for the filter to
handle. How many fish do you keep in there and how much do you
feed them? Because all the equipment you mentioned is good. Does
your Aquabead come with an air blower? I found out after five
years I wasn't cleaning mine right, therefore my beads were so
clumped up the water was bypassing them, cleaning nothing, the
water was coming out clear and the pond was staying dirty.

Please get back to me. Maybe we can resolve this thing together.

- Carolyn

==

Question>

My name is Bill. I added an addition to my existing pond that
was 300 gals. It was one of those preformed plastic ponds.

Now I added another pond (3000gals) to it. I cut the plastic on
one side and added the liner from the large pond to it. I'm
using a submersible pump in the large pond at the lowest point
to a bead filter. I am not sure if i am getting the proper
filtration between both ponds. Is this possible?

I am turning the water over 1 1/2 times per hr. I am using a
3500 gal per hr. to the filter and another 3500 per hr to the
skimmer filter which both dump down my waterfall.

It seems like its taking a awful long time for the proper
ecosystem to start working. I can't even keep goldfish alive.
Never mind expensive koi.

Thanks, Bill.

==

Answer>

Bill,

Have you checked the ammonia, nitrite and nitrate levels??

I never heard of using a submersible pump to a bead filter
before. What type of bead filter are you using and what type of
submersible pump can pump 3500 gallons per hour?

Aside from all that, you should try using MicrobeLift to jump
start your Bubble Bead and the pond system.

There sounds like something radically wrong if goldfish are
dying in the pond. My guess is like you said, it is with the
filtration. It is important not to have "dead" areas in a pond,
where water can stagnate. There must be water flow in all areas
of the pond.

- Carolyn

==

Happy Pondkeeping!

MacArthur Water Gardens
www.macarthurwatergardens.com

© MacArthur Water Gardens
PO Box 3628
Alpharetta, GA 30023-3628

Posted by bfogle at 11:59 AM | Comments (0)

August 11, 2005

Today's Pond Q&A

-------------------------------
Today's Pond Q&A

In this issue:

- Algae- Looks like green fiberglass?

- Fat Goldfish- eggbound or not?
-----------------------------

Question>

You already know what it is it floats to the surface and I skim
it off it grows back do I need to be concerned? My pond seems to
be doing well, I just added some reqular ole goldfish.

any advice?

Dave & Judy Colfesh

==

Answer>

There are some Microbe Lift products which will work in
controlling and removing algae for you. You don't necessarily
need be concerned as it won't harm the fish, but it doesn't look
that nice, does it? It is definitely a form of algae, either
blanketweed or string algae.

Microbelift PL and Barley Straw Pellets (or Extract) work
together
to eliminate the nutrients that algae feeds on without harming
humans, plants or fish in the pond.

- Carolyn

==

Question>

Dear Carolyn,

I have a goldfish that I have had since June and I’m quite sure
it was pregnant. It is very fat, however it is still very fat
and appears to be very healthy. Shouldn’t it have laid the eggs
by now?

Thanks,

Brenda

==

Answer>

Brenda, I am not sure what type of goldfish you bought, but some
are just built with large bodies and not necessarily ready to
spawn. Goldfish are known for their prolific regeneration
properties, so I can't even venture a guess as to the real reason
the fish is fat, but if a fish is female, doesn't lay the eggs in
this season, she will simply reabsorb them and try again next
year.

- Carolyn


Happy Pondkeeping!

MacArthur Water Gardens
www.macarthurwatergardens.com

© MacArthur Water Gardens
PO Box 3628
Alpharetta, GA 30023-3628

Posted by bfogle at 11:54 AM | Comments (0)

August 08, 2005

Today's Pond Q&A

-------------------------------
Today's Pond Q&A

In this issue:

- WARNING - Salt in the Pond

- Dying Goldfish

-----------------------------

IMPORTANT MESSAGE>

A member wrote that his fish died as a result of administering
salt to the pond. He was using a salt meter to get the correct
dosage, but the pond was overdosed.

What I want to tell readers is that when adding salt (or any
other chemicals) please never leave the pond unattended. If the
fish seem stressed, there is something wrong. Either there is
too much medicine going in, or the fish are too weakened to
handle the treatment in the first place. Please do not add
chemicals to treat parasites unless you have determined your fish
have parasite infestation, and know what type of parasite you are
treating.

As with any other medicine, "measure twice and dose once". If
there should be any signs of stress in the fish, like gasping for
air, erratic swimming, or other signs of dying, a 30-50% water
change is the first thing to do. Stop adding salt and do a water
change. Salt also should be added over a period of three days,
preferably in 1/3 increments.

And for safety purposes, I think it best that you use only 3
lb/100 gallons. Catfish and other scaleless fish can be
sensitive to salt. There are Koi health books available by Dr.
Erik L. Johnson, DVM and can be found at www.koivet.com website.

-Carolyn Weise

==

Question>

Hello Carolyn, I`m really just a beginner to keeping Goldfish and
have just built a new pond (about six weeks now) I am having
trouble with my Goldfish that I put in,they all seem to develop
a grey type of fungus over their bodies and of course die
because of it,I have tried recommended treatments,but they don`t
seem to be clearing it up.

We have very soft water here in Scotland,is there any more that I
can do before I purchase any

more fish.(strange that the Canary Golds introduced at the same
time have not shown this disease.) Hoping that you can help me
with this problem.

Best wishes and thank you for your excellent site.

James

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Answer>

Hi, James,

I wouldn't think soft water would harm the fish. I am told water
in Japan is soft too. But the fungus sounds terrible. Have you
had the fungus checked under a microscope to be sure it isn't a
parasite infection, like Ich? Ich sometimes will resemble
fungus.

I would suggest you take one of the infected fish to an expert
for a better diagnosis before trying to treat them. Sometimes
when certain fish in a pond do not exhibit disease they may have
developed immunity to the problem, but can be carriers. You
might try isolating the Canary Golds when you put in some new
fish and see if this is the case.

-Carolyn


Happy Pondkeeping!

MacArthur Water Gardens
www.macarthurwatergardens.com

© MacArthur Water Gardens
PO Box 3628
Alpharetta, GA 30023-3628

Posted by bfogle at 07:58 AM | Comments (0)