July 28, 2005

Today's Pond Q&A

--------------------------------------
Today's Pond Q&A

In this issue:

- UV Filtration

- Rocks in Ponds

- Planning Ahead
--------------------------------------

Question #1>

Hi:

We live in Ontario, Canada and have an 1800 sq ft pond. I just
read in one of your answers regarding UV lights that they should
be placed after the filter.

We have a Tetra Pond brand UV and Filter (the filter is the kind
that you don't need to clean manually - just backflush). We
bought the items new last year and we were told to place the UV
before the filter - the UV kills the living particles in the
water, then when the water goes through the filter, the filter
cleans all the "dead" particles out and the clean and filtered
water then goes back into the pond.

My question is what way do you feel is the best set up? Last
year before we bought this system we had a terrible problem with
"pea soup" water and no matter what we did or how much money we
spent on products that were supposed to relieve the problem we
always ended up draining the pond etc. Now our water has never
looked better - we can see clear to the bottom.

I also found a unit that conditions the water before it goes
through a UV and therefore is supposed to enhance the ability of
UV sterilizers. It has magnetic fields inside that zap larger
particles in the water before the water goes through the UV.
Have you used any of these and what do you think?

Thanks,

Connie

==

Answer>

Hi Connie,

I don't have a problem with the UV being set up in
front of the filter as much as I do with the submersible pump
feeding the system. The pump in this instance is "puree-ing" the
fish poop, making it that much harder for the filter to take it
out of your water. When you talk about "dead" particles, I am
assuming we are speaking of algae rather than fish waste. In
that case, yes, the dead algae cells should be eliminated by the
filter before re-entering the pond. But there is a whole lot
more to UV and filters than algae removal.

As long as your water is clear and you are happy with the
filtration, then it is working.

The key to healthy ponds and koi is good water quality, so
whatever will improve the water quality is going to be good.

I have heard of the water filters and think they are wonderful
but haven't had need for them myself. Check with your water
supplier to see what is in your water to find out if it is
necessary.

- Carolyn Weise

_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/
Pond Filters, Pumps, UV's and More...
Discount Prices at Our Online Store!
http://www.macarthurwatergardens.com
_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/

Question #2>

Can you put limestone rocks in the pond or will it kill my
fish....I have goldfish and koi....both of which are doing
great....just wanted to put something in there for my baby
goldfish to hide in.... and I was thinking about limestone
because it is a natural rock .....

==

Answer>

I don't know if limestone will harm the fish, but I might
suggest plants would be a better choice for the babies to hide
in, and a more natural refuge.

- Carolyn Weise

==

Question #3>

Hi Carolyn;

I have a pond between 550 and 600 gallons. I currently have
a pondmaster submersible pump and filter. It pumps 500gallons
/hour. It does keep my pond clear but thinking of my less agile
years, when I am no longer able to bend over the edge of the pond
to get to the filter and pump for cleaning, I need to think about
an external filter and possibly pump, if mine won't work with the
external filter. I want something that is easy to maintain but
not tooo expensive.

Thank You,

Lory

==

Answer>

Hi Lory,

The external pumps and filters can be quite costly and may be
more than your size pond needs.

I have seen people set their filters up outside the pond, or next
to their pond, in a separate "box-type" container with the
submersible pump feeding the filter in a place where they could
more easily access it. They had a line from the pump to the
filter and a line from the filter to the pond, just like any
other type filter. It was "in" the pond (in the ground next to
the pond) without being really in the pond.

Short of that, I suggest you look into one of the filters that
sit on the side of the pond. It would be easy to reach without
hanging into the pond.

- Carolyn

========== @SK Carolyn =============
Have a pond question? Just send it
in to: Carolyn@macarthurwatergardens.com
and our own in-house pond expert will
try and answer it for you!
====================================

Happy Pondkeeping!

Brett Fogle
MacArthur Water Gardens
www.macarthurwatergardens.com

© MacArthur Water Gardens
PO Box 3628
Alpharetta, GA 30023-3628

Posted by bfogle at 08:17 AM | Comments (0)

Today's Pond Q&A

-------------------------------
Today's Pond Q&A

In this issue:

- Can't see my koi

- String Algae

- Rocks in the pond

-----------------------------

Question>

Carolyn,

I have a 1,000 gallon Koi pond that is a year old. The koi in my
pond have just bred 11 baby Koi that are about 2” long. I am
very dissatisfied with the water clarity. I am particularly
unhappy with the volume of algae.

The chemical tests that I do often are always as follows:
Ph=6.4, Alkalinity=80, Nitrite=.03, Nitrate=30. I have 2 pumps.

Fountain Pump #1 is an 1800gph magnetic drive that flows about
900gph through a 20 watt UV sterilizer. The remainder of the
flow is discharged back to the skimmer.

Waterfall Pump #2 is a 3600gph magnetic drive that flows to a 15
gallon waterfall. The basin of the waterfall has 2 bags of
gravel media & 2 ‘Scotchbrite’ pads. We clean the waterfall
every week and it is a nasty job!

Skimmer is an 8” cylinder surface skimmer modified to draw water
3” from the bottom and maintain suction at the skimmer.

The deepest part of the pond is 28” and I can’t see the bottom.

What do you suggest for better water clarity? I thought about 2
more 20 Watt UV sterilizers but the specs on my existing 20 UV
say it should be good for 1000 gallons.

Brentwood

_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/
Introducing the New Pond Fresh PF-100 Hose Water Filter
Instantly Removes Chlorine, Chloramine, Ammonia & More.
Never Add De-Chlorinator or Unnecessary Chemicals Again!
http://www.macarthurwatergardens.com/pond-fresh/PF-100.shtml
_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/

Answer>

Dear Brentwood,

I would recommend a bubble bead filter at this point. That would
give you the clarity you are seeking and the bacterial balance
you need. It is the biological action that will clear up the
pond.

A bubblebead will be easier to maintain in that purging is much
simpler, backwashing once a week. And good luck with the babies!

==

Question>

Hi Carolyn and all.

Love reading the Q&A helps with everyone's issues.

My question is with string algea in rock and stone lined ponds.
Yes, I do have string algea. This year seems to be starting out
worse then prior and I have heard other pond owners say the same.

However, I had just heard something no one else has mentioned in
any way; that string algea are ALWAYS going to be prevelent and
grow with rocks and stone. No matter what you use or how hard you
fight it. Is this so? Should one take rocks out of their pond?
Curious, why, if this is true, pond builders and people who know
pond stuff do not put this information out more? Just wondering.
Any comments?

Always appreciate your input and advice.

Thanks

Larry in Detroit

==

Answer>

Hi, Larry.

Yes, string algae is going to be there, like air and water and
mosquitoes, and noise. We can't get rid of is the "fasteners" it
sets up on the rocks, which it would just as easily set up on
your waterfall or plants around the edge of the pond. You need
to understand algae, and that it is beneficial in the first
place, in order to deal with it efficiently.

Rocks don't actually belong in the pond...

Rocks belong around the pond, above the pond, and anywhere else
to enhance the look of the pond. but they present problems for
the fish if they are in the pond- sharp edges that will cut the
fish,crevaces for dirt to collect, and places where the water
doesn't flow creating small stagnant areas.

Now, back to the algae: You need to combat algae with other
green-growing plants. They will compete with the algae for
nutrients. String algae will usually be eaten by the fish, to
some degree, in the pond, and is easier to remove with a stick
than other forms of algae. You can use algacides,but I don't
recommend this.

The dying algae will add to the depleted oxygen in the water,
something you don't want in summer heat. And the fish eat it. I
pull the string algae out of my pond when it appears. It's like
weeding the garden, something I do without thinking. By not
putting rocks in my pond, I haven't prevented string algae. And
yes, please take the rocks out of the pond regardless of the
algae.

_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/
Discover the tips and secrets of the professionals...
New eBook covers all important elements of pond building and
water gardening -'Water Gardens Made Easy' is availabe now.
Click here to reserve your copy: www.water-garden-secrets.com
_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/

Question>

I have a question. Is it a good idea to put stone in
the bottom of the pond to stop the UV from effecting the liner? I
was told you should have stone in the bottom.

==

Answer>

That is a very good question. But, no, as mentioned above, I do
not recommend putting stone in the pond. the standard EPDM
liners are treated to sustain the sun's UV rays, underwater, and
in a short time the liner will be covered with a natural
protective layer of bacteria and algae, therefore no stones would
be necessary. Any liner that is sitting above ground, perhaps
around the perimeter of the pond,should be protected by some type
of covering.

- Carolyn

==

Happy Pondkeeping!

MacArthur Water Gardens
www.macarthurwatergardens.com

© MacArthur Water Gardens
PO Box 3628
Alpharetta, GA 30023-3628

_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/
Visit our other websites:
www.pond-filters-online.com
http://www.4-pond-pumps.com
_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/

Posted by bfogle at 08:15 AM | Comments (0)

July 27, 2005

Today's Pond Q&A

------------------------------
Today's Pond Q&A

In this issue:

- Pea Soup in Ponds?

- More UV Questions
------------------------------


Question #1>

Hi,

I have just purchased a bio filter. This filter also has a
ultaviolet let in it.

It is reccomended for ponds up to 2,000 gallons.

Do these filters work well in ridding my water of pea soup algae?

Thanks, Jim
==

Answer>

Congratulations on taking corrective action, Jim! The UV should
take care of the pea soup algae.

That is the type algae that a UV light will be able to remove.

Give it a couple of days and you should see a big improvement.

- Carolyn Weise

_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/
Pond Filters, Pumps, UV's and More...
Discount Prices at Our Online Store!
http://www.macarthurwatergardens.com
_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/

Question #2>

I'm a beginner here with a rectangular pond size is 10 x 6 x 18
inches.

The pump I have is circulating the water around quite fast and I
also have the fountain shooting the water about 3 ft. high.

I also have 6 gold fish.

The flter they sold me is a Laguna Power Flo , but I can't get my
water to clear.

Hope to hear from you

Phyllis

==

Answer>

Hi, Phyllis.

I don't know if you have plants in the pond or just the goldfish,
but it sounds like the filter should be adequate.

However, I would add a UV light if it is an algae bloom that is
making the water "not clear" at this point. This is the heat of
the season so any water in the sun will tend to grow algae and
other plants.

If the water color is NOT GREEN, then perhaps the pond needs to
be vacuumed out, water changed, or simply the pond time to become
established. In time the sides and bottom of the pond become
"slime-coated" which in fact make the pond itself part of the
bio-filtration.

Let me know if the UV doesn't clear up the problem.

- Carolyn Weise

========== @SK Carolyn =============

Have a pond question? Just send it
in to: Carolyn@macarthurwatergardens.com
and our own in-house pond expert will
try and answer it for you!
====================================

Happy Pondkeeping!

Brett Fogle
MacArthur Water Gardens
www.macarthurwatergardens.com

© MacArthur Water Gardens
PO Box 3628
Alpharetta, GA 30023-3628

Posted by bfogle at 03:02 AM | Comments (0)

July 26, 2005

Today's Pond Q&A

-------------------------------
Today's Pond Q&A

In this issue:

- Beginner pond questions

- Rocks in the bottom of ponds?

-----------------------------

Question>

Hi there
I have recently moved into a new home with a large pond. I am
therefore a beginer! Can you tell me what an ultra violet light
does and where it should be situated?

Also I have noticed several orange coloured specks in the water,
any idea what this is please?

I have some Koi and some goldfish - its a very big pond!

Regards
Shirley

_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/
Pond Filters, Pumps, UV's and More...
Discount Prices at Our Online Store!
http://www.macarthurwatergardens.com
_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/

Answer>

The UV light is specifically to kill bacteria that would infect
your fish, but is more commonly used to kill the free-floating
algae in ponds.

It should be placed after the filter, where the water is
cleanest, before it reenters the pond. Mine is situated before
the waterfall. It is also important to have an UV light that is
big enough for the amount of water you are treating...

Do you know the dimensions of the pond? You can figure out the
gallons by measuring the length, the width and the depth of the
pond at its deepest point. Or perhaps the former owners can tell
you how many gallons are in the pond and save you some trouble.

As for the orange specks, I can't imagine what that could be
unless scales from a fish. If you can get them out and examine
them more closely you might be able to determine what they are.

Hope this helps..

- Carolyn Weise

==

Question #2>

Hi Folks,

We are in the process of digging out a 300 gallon pond that is
envisioned to have 12" wide plant shelves around the outside,
except under the waterfall, and to be 36" deep in the middle for
winter living of the various fish that are waiting to be put in
their new home.

The video that came with our pond kit indicates we are to place
large rocks on the shelves and put gravel on the bottom.

It seems that one of your E-mail letters indicated that putting
rocks in the pond is not good from the cleanliness standpoint.

Please confirm what's best to do...

Thanks very much.

Dick Smith

==

Answer>

Hi Dick,

No, we do not advocate putting anything on the bottom of a koi
pond. It collects dirt and dirt is something you never want in
the pond.

The Aquascape ponds advocate pebble bottoms, but if you read
their manual (and I don't know if this is the type pond kit you
have) they also say to remove everything and blast the crud out
of it annually, which is something that is contraindicated in
developing a pond ecosystem.

You would want the beneficial bacteria and moss-like algae to
grow on the sides and bottom of the pond. They will keep the
pond healthy. If you have to power wash and remove all that
beneficial growth every year, what good have you accomplished?

At any rate, no rocks on the bottom of the pond. In fact, I
don't even recommend plant shelves if you are planning to keep
fish. Koi in particular will upturn any plants you try to put on
these shelves and the shelves become attractive to raccoons and
other predators visiting your pond.

- Carolyn Weise

========== @SK Carolyn =============

Have a pond question? Just send it
in to: Carolyn@macarthurwatergardens.com
and our own in-house pond expert will
try and answer it for you!
====================================


Happy Pondkeeping!

Brett Fogle
MacArthur Water Gardens
http://www.macarthurwatergardens.com

© MacArthur Water Gardens
PO Box 3628
Alpharetta, GA 30023-3628

-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-

This email is never sent without permission.

You (or someone using your email address) bought something from
MacArthur Water Gardens, or signed up for our newsletter,
affiliate program, mini-course or requested a fr^e report..

The information we have on file is Your name: [[firstname]]
Your email: [[email]]

If you wish to be removed from this list, simply click once on
the link below.

Posted by bfogle at 07:48 AM | Comments (0)