November 21, 2005

Today's Pond Q&A

-------------------------------
Today's Pond Q&A

In this issue:

- PLECOSTOMUS OR COON? WHO'S EATING THE FISH?

- SICK FISH - PARASITES OR KHV?
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Question>

Question concerning your remark about the catfish; does
that include Plecostomus? We have two growing Plecostomus
in our pond and have also had several of our fish go
missing, although we seem to have reproduction going on at
a slow rate (3-4 little fish at a time).

At the time of the disappearance, we thought it might be a
raccoon, and since we installed an 8' gate across the
courtyard with the 8' rock walls we have had only one go
missing. The fish that disappear are always large and
colorful, never the little guys. What do you think? Coon or
Plecostomus?

Tom Ballou
Canyon Lake, TX

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Answer>

Raccoons are very resourceful animals! But about the pleco-
can the larger fish fit in its mouth? If so, I would still
blame the pleco. If the pond is shallow, or has shallow
areas that are good "hunting" areas for a raccoon, or if a
raccoon has ever positively eaten out of your pond, then you
have problems coming from both directions.

To rule out the raccoons, I learned to trap them in a
have-a-heart trap with peanut butter slathered on a bed of
aluminum foil folded up to the size of a slice of white
bread, set in the end of the trap where they will have to
step on the trip. Gets them every time if they are in the
area. So, try the traps. If you don't catch a raccoon,
then take the pleco out of the pond. I venture to say the
fish will stop disappearing.

-Carolyn

==

Question>

Hi Carolyn,

The pond is lovely!! You live in Florida?? As for the
waterfall, unless you get freezing temps where you live, I
wouldn't bother shutting it down at all. But as a general
rule, we shut them down to keep from super cooling the pond
from colder air temperatures. I don't recommend using any
parasite treatment until there is a definitive diagnosis.
Then I would use a treatment for that specific parasite.
Some parasites need strong medicines, some kill easily.
Salt is the generally accepted first-line defense for
parasites and most people use it prophylactically, without
diagnosis. Unless you have somewhere for the salted water
to go after treatment (3-weeks) then I don't even recommend
that.

I like to have my fish "scraped and scoped" (examine the
scrapings under the microscope) to find out what I am
dealing with. It is my personal opinion that we should not
dump any chemicals into the pond that do not normally belong
there, without doing the research. I rely on Microbe-Lift
products and very little else. But in spring, I like to add
LymnoZyme to the pond as an added protection from Aeromonas
infection. The parasites don't kill the fish. The
secondary infections do.

Thanks again

Rick

==

Answer>

The pond is lovely!! You live in Florida?? As for the
waterfall, unless you get freezing temps where you live, I
wouldn't bother shutting it down at all. But as a general
rule, we shut them down to keep from super cooling the pond
from colder air temperatures.

I don't recommend using any parasite treatment until there
is a definitive diagnosis. Then I would use a treatment for
that specific parasite. Some parasites need strong
medicines, some kill easily. Salt is the generally accepted
first-line defense for parasites and most people use it
prophylactically, without diagnosis. Unless you have
somewhere for the salted water to go after treatment
(3-weeks) then I don't even recommend that.

I like to have my fish "scraped and scoped" (examine the
scrapings under the microscope) to find out what I am
dealing with. It is my personal opinion that we should not
dump any chemicals into the pond that do not normally belong
there, without doing the research. I rely on Microbe-Lift
products and very little else. But in spring, I like to add
LymnoZyme to the pond as an added protection from Aeromonas
infection. The parasites don't kill the fish. The
secondary infections do.

- Carolyn

==
Happy Pondkeeping!

MacArthur Water Gardens
www.macarthurwatergardens.com

MacArthur Water Gardens
PO Box 3628
Alpharetta, GA 30023-3628

Posted by bfogle at November 21, 2005 02:09 PM
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